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See also: Accouchement

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1803. Borrowed from French accoucher (to be delivered of a child, to aid in delivery), from Old French acouchier (to lay down, put to bed, go to bed), from Latin ad + collocare (to lay, put, place). See collate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accouchement (countable and uncountable, plural accouchements)

  1. Delivery in childbed; parturition
    Custom required that the royal family and the whole Court should be present at the accouchement of the Princesses.
    • 1856, St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal (volume 14, page 153)
      A physician was occupied in making an autopsia of a woman dead of puerperal fever, when some one came for him to terminate an accouchement in the town.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

accoucher +‎ -ment

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /a.kuʃ.mɑ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

accouchement m (plural accouchements)

  1. delivery (act of giving birth)

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit