ad-

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

from the Latin prefix ad-.

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. near, at.
    adrenal.
  2. toward, to, tendency, or addition.
    adjoin.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ad-” in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • ad-” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Prefix form of ad.

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. to (indicating that to which there is movement, tendency or position, with or without arrival)
    portar ‎(carry, bear) → adportar ‎(bring, carry (to a person or place))
    ube ‎(where) → adube ‎(where to (with motion), whither)

Derived termsEdit



LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

For euphony, ad- can assimilate the attached stem's initial consonant, becoming: a- (before sc and sp), ac- (before c and q), af- (before f), ag-, al-, ap-, ar-, as-, or at-.

EtymologyEdit

ad ‎(towards)

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. to

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ád ‎(near, at). Cognates include Latin ad and English at.

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. to, towards
  2. in many compounds, it has a purely intensive sense

Derived termsEdit


MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ad- unchanged n-ad-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • ad-” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. ad- (near; at)
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