EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin ad-

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. (no longer productive) near, at.
    adrenal
  2. (no longer productive) toward, to, tendency, or addition.
    adjoin

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. ad-

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Prefix form of ad.

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. to (indicating that to which there is movement, tendency or position, with or without arrival)
    portar (carry, bear)adportar (bring, carry (to a person or place))
    ube (where)adube (where to (with motion), whither)

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

For euphony, ad- can assimilate the attached stem's initial consonant, becoming: a- (before sc, sp and st), ac- (before c and q), af- (before f), ag-, al-, ap-, ar-, as-, or at-.

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin preposition ad (to, towards), in turn from Proto-Italic *ad, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (near, at).

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. to
  2. usually prefixed to verbs, in which cases it often has the effect of intensifying the verbal action

See alsoEdit


LushootseedEdit

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. your (singular)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *ad-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (near, at). Cognates include Latin ad and English at.

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. to, towards
  2. in many compounds, it has a purely intensive sense
  3. augment infix used instead of ro- on verbs whose first prefix is com- and the stressed syllable starts with a consonant
    con·birt (you conceived) + ‎ad- → ‎con·abairt (you have conceived) (forms of con·beir)
    con·melt ((s)he rubbed) + ‎ad- → ‎con·amailt ((s)he had rubbed) (forms of con·meil)
    ·coscrad (not destroyed) + ‎ad- → ‎·comscarad (had not destroyed) (past subjunctive prototonic forms of con·scara)
    con·gab (it contained) + ‎ad- → ‎con·acab (it had contained) (forms of con·gaib)
    *·cotla + ‎ad- → ‎·comthala (subjunctive forms of con·tuili (to sleep))

Usage notesEdit

  • ad-, when used as an augment affix, vanishes in prototonic forms due to syncope. However, its presence may be detected via the different syncope patterns between forms augmented with ad- and those that were not.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: a- (no longer productive)

AntonymsEdit

Old Irish ó, úa (from, of)

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ad- unchanged n-ad-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. ad- (near; at)

WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *ate-, from Proto-Celtic *ati-.[1] from Proto-Indo-European *éti.[2] Cognate with Cornish as-, English ed-, Latin et (and), Sanskrit अति (ati, over-).

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

ad-

  1. again, back, re-
    ad- + ‎llais (voice) → ‎adlais (echo)
    ad- + ‎talu (to pay) → ‎ad-dalu (to refund)
    ad- + ‎blas (taste) → ‎adflas (aftertaste)
    Synonym: ail-
  2. affirmative prefix, emphasises prefixed word
    ad- + ‎cas (hated, nasty) → ‎atgas (hateful, detestable)

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ad- unchanged unchanged had-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ J. Morris Jones, A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative (Oxford 1913), § 156 i (1),
  2. ^ J. Morris Jones, A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative (Oxford 1913), § 222 i (3).