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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English adamantine, from Latin adamantinus.

AdjectiveEdit

adamantine (comparative more adamantine, superlative most adamantine)

  1. Made of adamant, or having the qualities of adamant; incapable of being broken, dissolved, or penetrated.
    adamantine bonds
    adamantine chains
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book I, lines 44–49:
      Him the Almighty Power
      Hurld headlong flaming from th' Ethereal Skie
      With hideous ruine and combustion down
      To bottomless perdition, there to dwell
      In Adamantine Chains and penal Fire,
      Who durst defie th' Omnipotent to Arms.
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      For two hours they stand; Bouillé's sword glittering in his hand, adamantine resolution clouding his brows[.]
    • 1984, Gayle Rubin, "Thinking Sex" in Carole S. Vance, Pleasure and Danger: Exploring Female Sexuality (Boston: Routledge and Kegan Paul), 267-319.
      Sex law is the most adamantine instrument of sexual stratification and erotic persecution.
  2. Like the diamond in hardness or luster.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

adamantine

  1. feminine singular of adamantin

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

adamantine f pl

  1. feminine plural of adamantino

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

adamantine

  1. vocative masculine singular of adamantinus

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin adamantinus; equivalent to adamant +‎ -ine.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /adəˈmantiːn(ə)/, /adəˈmau̯ntiːn(ə)/

AdjectiveEdit

adamantine

  1. (rare) Relating to adamant; adamantine.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: adamantine

ReferencesEdit