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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin.

NounEdit

admonitor (plural admonitors)

  1. An admonisher; a monitor.
    • 1547, John Hooper, An Answer vnto my Lord of Wynthesters Booke Intytlyd a Detection of the Deuyls Sophistrye, Zurich: Augustyne Fries,[1]
      But as a wyckyd person he contemnyd all admonicions, desirid to finishe his treyterons purpose, and after that he had eatyn of that holy supper, he depertyd out of Christes companye, and with all dil[i]gence sowght how to haue his admonitour slaine.
    • 1673, Urian Oakes, New-England Pleaded With, Cambridge, Massachusetts, p. 35,[2]
      [] mens hearts rise and swell against faithful Admonitors, and they must not be reproved or contradicted.
    • 1764, William Shenstone, Essays on Men, Manners, and Things in The Works in Verse and Prose of William Shenstone, London: R. & J. Dodsley, Volume 2, p. 307,[3]
      Conscience is [] at most times a very faithful and a very prudent admonitor.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

admonitor m (plural admonitores)

  1. admonitor; admonisher (someone who admonishes)

AdjectiveEdit

admonitor m (feminine singular admonitora, masculine plural admonitores, feminine plural admonitoras, comparable)

  1. (rare) admonitive (conveying admonition)