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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

all +‎ American.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

all-American (not comparable)

  1. Comprising things that are wholly from the United States of America; completely made in the United States.
    • 2018 June 5, Jonah Engel Bromwich; Vanessa Friedman; Matthew Schneier, “Kate Spade, whose handbags carried women into adulthood, is dead at 55”, in The New York Times[1], New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, ISSN 0362-4331, OCLC 971436363:
      Her name [Kate Spade] became a shorthand for the cute, clever bags that were an instant hit with cosmopolitan women in the early stages of their careers and, later, young girls — status symbols of a more attainable, all-American sort than a Fendi clutch or Chanel bag.
  2. Regarded as embodying the ideal qualities of the United States; (specifically) of a person: courageous, heroic; honest, wholesome, etc.
  3. (US, chiefly sports) Of a person or a team, or some other thing: regarded as the best in the United States.
    He was an all-American basketball player last year.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

all-American (plural all-Americans)

  1. A person or thing regarded as embodying the ideal qualities of the United States of America; (specifically) a person from the United States who is courageous, heroic, honest, wholesome, etc.
    He was regarded by the other soldiers as an all-American for his courage in battle.
  2. (US, chiefly sports) A person or a team, or some other thing, regarded as the best in the United States.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit