See also: Team

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English teme, from Old English tēam (child-bearing, offspring, brood, set of draught animals), from Proto-Germanic *taumaz (that which draws or pulls), from Proto-Germanic *taugijaną, *tugōną, *teuhōną, *teuhaną (to lead, bring, pull, draw), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to pull, lead). Cognate with Scots team, teem (a chain, harness), West Frisian team (bridle, team), Dutch toom (bridle, reins, flock of birds), German Zaum (bridle), Norwegian tømme (bridle, rein), Swedish töm (leash, rein). More at teem, tie, tow.

NounEdit

team (plural teams)

  1. A set of draught animals, such as two horses in front of a carriage.
  2. Any group of people involved in the same activity, especially sports or work.
    We need more volunteers for the netball team.
    The IT manager leads a team of three software developers.
  3. (obsolete) A group of animals moving together, especially young ducks.
  4. (Britain, law, obsolete) A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping, and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes, and villains, and their offspring, or suit, that is, goods and chattels, and appurtenances thereto.
    • 1871, Alexander M. Burrill, Law Dictioary & Glossary, vol II, [1]
      TEAM, Theam, Tem, Them. Sax. [from tyman, to propagate, to teem.] In old English law. Literally, an offspring, race or generation. A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes and villeins, and their offspring or suit. They who had a jurisdiction of this kind, were said to have a court of Theme... constantly used in the old books in connection with toll, in the expression Toll & Team.
  5. A group of people who favor one side of a binary debate that is divided and lacks a well-established clear consensus.
    • 2019 December 27, Bill Chappell, “People Can't Even Agree On When The Decade Ends”, in NPR[2]:
      As Jan. 1, 2020, approaches, it turns out there is a Team Zero and a Team 1 – those who believe the new decade will begin after midnight on the upcoming New Year's Eve and those who believe the burgeoning celebrations of a new decade (and all the "last decade" retrospectives) are in fact a year early.
Usage notesEdit
  • In British English, team is construed as plural, emphasizing the members. In US English it is construed as singular, emphasizing the group. This conforms to the general practice in the two dialects for collective nouns.
    • British English:
      2012, Institute of Leadership & Management, Building the Team[3], page 124:
      At the storming stage, the team are trying to establish relationships with one another, and to determine who will take the dominant roles.
    • American English:
      2010, William G. Dyer, W. Gibb Dyer, Jr., Jeffrey H. Dyer, Team Building: Proven Strategies for Improving Team Performance[4]:
      When a subordinate wants to give feedback to a boss, this is typically only done in a roundabout way through the “grapevine” (other members of the team), usually when the team is out at night drinking.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Catalan: tim
  • Dutch: team
    • Indonesian: tim
  • German: Team
  • Italian: team
  • Japanese: チーム (chīmu)
  • Korean: (tim)
  • Portuguese: time
  • Swedish: team
  • Welsh: tîm
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

team (third-person singular simple present teams, present participle teaming, simple past and past participle teamed)

  1. (intransitive) To form a group, as for sports or work.
    They teamed to complete the project.
  2. (intransitive, by extension) To go together well; to harmonize.
    • 2005, Jill Dupleix, Good Cooking: The New Basics (page 32)
      Rich, creamy avocado is cut back by the citrus sharpness of grapefruit in this Israeli-inspired salad. It's brilliant for a brunchy breakfast, and teams well with grilled salmon, tuna, or mackerel for dinner.
  3. (transitive) To convey or haul with a team.
    to team lumber
    • 1857, Henry David Thoreau journal entry for Feb. 4 1857
      the farmer has been all winter teaming wood along the river
  4. (transitive) To form together into a team.
    to team oxen
  5. (transitive) To give work to a gang under a subcontractor.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

team

  1. Misspelling of teem.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English team, from Middle English teme, from Old English tēam (child-bearing, offspring, brood, set of draught animals), from Proto-Germanic *taumaz (that which draws or pulls), from Proto-Germanic *taugijaną, *tugōną, *teuhōną, *teuhaną (to lead, bring, pull, draw), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to pull, lead). Doublet with native Dutch toom.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

team n (plural teams, diminutive teampje n)

  1. team (group of people)
    Synonym: ploeg

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

team m (invariable)

  1. team (group of people)
    Synonyms: squadra, gruppo

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

team

  1. Alternative form of teme (folk)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English team

NounEdit

team n (definite singular teamet, indefinite plural team, definite plural teama or teamene)

  1. a team

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English team

NounEdit

team n (definite singular teamet, indefinite plural team, definite plural teama)

  1. a team

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *taumaz (pull, draw).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tēam m (nominative plural tēamas)

  1. childbirth
  2. family, offspring
  3. a team of draught animals
  4. an Anglo-Saxon legal procedure in a stolen goods suit

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English team.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

team n

  1. a team of people

DeclensionEdit

Declension of team 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative team teamet team teamen
Genitive teams teamets teams teamens

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


West FrisianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

team c (plural teammen, diminutive teamke)

  1. bridle
Further readingEdit
  • team (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English team.

NounEdit

team n (plural teams, diminutive teamke)

  1. team
    Sirkulaasjefollybal is in fariant op it gewoane follybal, mei 4 spilers yn elts team.
    Mini-volleyball is a variation of normal volleyball, with 4 players on each team.
    Synonym: ploech
Derived termsEdit