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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

alluring

  1. present participle of allure

NounEdit

alluring (plural allurings)

  1. The action of the verb allure.
    • 1615, George Wither, Fidelia
      Was this poor breast, from Love's allurings free, / Cruel to all, and gentle unto thee ?
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick
      For, as when the red-cheeked, dancing girls, April and May, trip home to the wintry, misanthropic woods; even the barest, ruggedest, most thunder-cloven old oak will at least send forth some few green sprouts, to welcome such glad-hearted visitants; so Ahab did, in the end, a little respond to the playful allurings of that girlish air.
    • 1952, Daughters of the American Revolution magazine (volume 86, page 250)
      Lookout heights and Smoky Mountains have allurings all their own.

AdjectiveEdit

alluring (comparative more alluring, superlative most alluring)

  1. Having the power to allure.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0105:
      Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.

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