See also: almogávar

English

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Etymology

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From Spanish almogávar.

Noun

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almogavar (plural almogavars)

  1. (historical) A lightly-clad footsoldier during the Christian reconquest of Islamic Spain.

Translations

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Old Galician-Portuguese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Andalusian Arabic المُغَاوِر (al-muḡā́wir), from Arabic مُغَاوِر (muḡāwir).

Noun

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almogavar m (plural almogavares)

  1. rider, marauder, applied mostly to Christian soldiers who realized raids on Muslim territories during the Middle Ages
    • c. 1295, Ramón Lorenzo, editor, Cronica General:
      Os almogauares cristãos desa oste que el rrey dõ Fernando tĩjna sobre Seuilla seyã muy ameude per todas partes per du entendiã que dos mouros poderiã gãanar.
      The Christian marauders of this army that king Ferdinand had on Seville used to raid very frequently everywhere that they thought that they could make profit out of the Moors

Descendants

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  • Galician: almogávar
  • Portuguese: almogávar

References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “almogavar”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “almogavar”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG