Open main menu

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ryder, ridere, from Late Old English rīdere (rider, knight); equivalent to ride +‎ -er. Compare Dutch rijder, German Reiter, Swedish ryttare.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: rī'də(r), IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪdə(ɹ)/
  • (US) enPR: rī'dər, IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪdɚ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪdə(r)

NounEdit

rider (plural riders)

  1. One who rides, often on a horse or a motorcycle.
  2. (politics) A provision annexed to a bill under the consideration of a legislature, having little connection with the subject matter of the bill.
  3. (by extension) Something extra or burdensome that is imposed.
    • A. S. Hardy
      This [question] was a rider which Mab found difficult to answer.
  4. An amendment or addition to an entertainer's performance contract, often covering a performer's equipment or food, drinks, and general comfort requirements.
  5. (insurance) An additional benefit attached to an insurance contract.
  6. A small, sliding piece of aluminium on a chemical balance, used to determine small weights.
  7. (Britain, archaic) An agent who goes out with samples of goods to obtain orders; a commercial traveller.
  8. (obsolete) One who breaks in or manages a horse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  9. (cartomancy) The first Lenormand card, also known as either the horseman or the cavalier.
  10. (mathematics) A problem of extra difficulty added to another on an examination paper.
  11. An old Dutch gold coin with the figure of a man on horseback stamped upon it.
    • J. Fletcher
      His mouldy money! half a dozen riders.
  12. (mining) Rock material in a vein of ore, dividing it.
  13. (shipbuilding) An interior rib occasionally fixed in a ship's hold, reaching from the keelson to the beams of the lower deck, to strengthen the frame.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  14. (nautical) The second tier of casks in a vessel's hold.
  15. A small forked weight which straddles the beam of a balance, along which it can be moved in the manner of the weight on a steelyard.
  16. (obsolete, Britain, dialectal) A robber.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Drummond to this entry?)
  17. (chess) A piece, such as the rook or bishop, which moves any distance in one direction, as long as no other piece is in the way.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

rider c

  1. indefinite plural of ride

VerbEdit

rider

  1. present of ride

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French rider, from Old French rider (to wrinkle), from Old High German rīdan, wrīdan (to turn; twist; wind; wring; wind up; wrench), from Proto-Germanic *wrīþaną (to turn; wind), from Proto-Indo-European *wreyt- (to turn), from *wer- (to turn). Cognate with German reiden (to turn; tie up; lace). More at writhe.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rider

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to wrinkle

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English ride.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rider

  1. (Louisiana, Cajun French) to ride

ConjugationEdit


InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

rider

  1. to laugh

Related termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

rider

  1. Alternative form of ryder

Middle Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From rîden (ride), from Proto-Germanic *rīdaną. Cognate with English rider and German Reiter (rider).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rîder

  1. a rider

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

rider

  1. present of ride

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

rider m (plural rideres)

  1. rider, biker (motorcyclist)

SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

rider

  1. present tense of rida.