See also: ambe'

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ionic Ancient Greek [Term?], from [Term?] (a ridge).

NounEdit

ambe

  1. (historical) An old mechanical contrivance, ascribed to Hippocrates, for reducing dislocations of the shoulder.

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ambō.

DeterminerEdit

ambe

  1. (quantifying) both
    Rodolfo Cerrón-Palomino proponeva un standard litterari, Quechua meridional, que combina characteristicas de ambe dialectos.[1]
    Rodolfo Cerrón-Palomino proposed a literary standard, Southern Quechua, which combines characteristics of both dialects.

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈam.be/
  • Rhymes: -ambe
  • Hyphenation: àm‧be

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ambae, nominative singular feminine of ambō (both).

DeterminerEdit

ambe f pl

  1. (literary, rare) feminine plural of ambo (both)

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

ambe f pl

  1. plural of amba

North MuyuEdit

NounEdit

ambe

  1. father
    je ambe — his father
    ju ambe — her father

ReferencesEdit

  • Jan Honoré Maria Cornelis Boelaars, The Linguistic Position of South-Western New Guinea (III), chapter XII, Kati language
  • Johan Willem Schoorl, Culture and Change Among the Muyu (1993), page 307

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ambō; cf. Italian ambo.

DeterminerEdit

ambe

  1. (quantifying) both

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ambe

  1. locative singular of amba (mango)
  2. accusative plural of amba (mango tree)