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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bothe, boþe, from Old English bā þā (both the; both those) and Old Norse báðir, from Proto-Germanic *bai-. Cognate with Saterland Frisian bee (both), West Frisian beide (both), Dutch beide (both), German beide (both), Swedish både, båda, Danish både, Norwegian både, Icelandic báðir. Replaced Middle English from Old English , , and beġen, also from Proto-Germanic *bai-.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

both

  1. Each of the two; one and the other; referring to two individuals or items.
    "Did you want this one or that one?" — "Give me both."
    Both children are such dolls.
    • Bible, Genesis xxi. 27
      Abraham took sheep and oxen, and gave them unto Abimelech; and both of them made a covenant.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Viscount Bolingbroke
      He will not bear the loss of his rank, because he can bear the loss of his estate; but he will bear both, because he is prepared for both.
  2. Each of the two kinds; one and the other kind; referring to several individuals or items which are divided into two groups.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.

TranslationsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

both

  1. Including both of (used with and).
    Both you and I are students.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 4, in An Autobiography, part II, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. There was a great deal of them, lavish both in material and in workmanship.
  2. (obsolete) Including all of (used with and).
    • (Can we date this quote?) Oliver Goldsmith
      Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Samuel Taylor Coleridge
      He prayeth well who loveth well both man and bird and beast.
    • 1892, Richard Congreve, Essays Political, Social, and Religious (volume 2, page 615)
      [] as he appreciates its beauty and its rich gifts, as he regards it with venerant love, fed by both his intellectual powers, his contemplation, and his meditation.

TranslationsEdit

QuotationsEdit

See alsoEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish both (hut, bothy, cot; cabin), from Proto-Celtic *butā (compare Middle Welsh bot (dwelling)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to be).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

both f (genitive singular botha, nominative plural bothanna or botha)

  1. Booth, hut.

DeclensionEdit

Alternative declension

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
both bhoth mboth
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "both" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “both” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • 2 both” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse búð.

NounEdit

both (plural boths)

  1. Alternative form of bothe (booth)

Etymology 2Edit

Old English bā þā; influenced by Old Norse báðir.

DeterminerEdit

both

  1. Alternative form of bothe (both)

ConjunctionEdit

both

  1. Alternative form of bothe (both)

Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

both

  1. preterite passive conjunct of at·tá