Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin armāmentum (arsenal), from armāmenta (tools).

NounEdit

armamentarium (plural armamentariums or armamentaria)

  1. All of the equipment available for carrying out a task, especially all the equipment used by a physician in the practice of medicine.
    • 2010, Timothy J. Nelson et al., "Induced pluripotent stem cells: advances to applications," Stem Cells and Cloning: Advances and Applications, Dove Press, no. 3, p. 29:
      Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology has enriched the armamentarium of regenerative medicine by introducing autologous pluripotent progenitor pools bioengineered from ordinary somatic tissue.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From armāmenta (tools, equipment, rigging) +‎ -ārium.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ar.maː.menˈtaː.ri.um/, [ar.maː.mɛnˈtaː.ri.ũ]

NounEdit

armāmentārium n (genitive armāmentāriī); second declension

  1. arsenal

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative armāmentārium armāmentāria
genitive armāmentāriī armāmentāriōrum
dative armāmentāriō armāmentāriīs
accusative armāmentārium armāmentāria
ablative armāmentāriō armāmentāriīs
vocative armāmentārium armāmentāria

ReferencesEdit

  • armamentarium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • armamentarium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • armamentarium” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • armamentarium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • armamentarium in Samuel Ball Platner (1929), Thomas Ashby, editor, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press
  • armamentarium in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • armamentarium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin