auctrix

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin auctrix

NounEdit

auctrix (plural auctrixes)

  1. (medicine, archaic) A class of natural faculty.
    • 1826, “Article XII. – Retrospective Review. – Tractatus de Ventriculo et Intestinis, cui præmittitur alius…”, in The North American Medical and Surgical Journal, page 145:
      Under the class of natural faculties, we find three principal sorts; to wit, a facultas generatrix, an auctrix, and a nutrix.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from auctor, from Latin auctus, perfect passive participle of augeō (to increase, nourish). Surface analysis: auc(tor) (originator) +‎ -trīx (-ess, -rix, feminine agent noun suffix).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

auctrīx f (genitive auctrīcis, masculine auctor); third declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) a female originator
    Ave Maria, o auctrix vitae
    Hail Mary, originator of life

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative auctrīx auctrīcēs
Genitive auctrīcis auctrīcum
Dative auctrīcī auctrīcibus
Accusative auctrīcem auctrīcēs
Ablative auctrīce auctrīcibus
Vocative auctrīx auctrīcēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • auctrix in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • auctrix in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette