bâtard

See also: batard

FrenchEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French bâtard, from Old French bastard (child of a nobleman by a woman other than his wife), from Medieval Latin bastardus (illegitimate child), from Proto-Germanic *banstuz, *bunstuz (a bond), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind) + -ard. Cognate with Old Frisian bōst (marriage), Middle Dutch basture (whore, prostitute) (from bast + hure). Eclipsed native terms Latin spurius and nothus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɑ.taʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bâtard m (plural bâtards, feminine bâtarde)

  1. a bastard (person born to unmarried parents)
  2. (botany) a hybrid plant
  3. a batard (short baguette)
  4. (slang) bastard, asshole

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bastard (child of a nobleman by a woman other than his wife), from Medieval Latin bastardus (illegitimate child), from Proto-Germanic *banstuz, *bunstuz (a bond), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind).

NounEdit

bâtard m (plural bâtards)

  1. (Jersey) bastard

SynonymsEdit