See also: Bastard

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɑːstə(ɹ)d/, /ˈbæstə(ɹ)d/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbæstəɹd/
  • (file)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bastard, bastarde, from Late Old English bastard ‎(bastard), from Anglo-Norman bastard ‎(illegitimate child), from Old Low Frankish *bāst ‎(marriage) (compare Middle Dutch bast ‎(lust, heat)) and derogatory suffix -ard, from Proto-Germanic *banstuz ‎(bond, tie) (compare West Frisian boask, boaste ‎(marriage)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- ‎(to tie, bind); or equivalent to bast +‎ -ard. Cognate with West Frisian bastert ‎(bastard), Dutch bastaard ‎(bastard), German Bastard ‎(bastard), Icelandic bastarður ‎(bastard). Probably originally referred to a child from a polygynous marriage of Germanic custom but not sanctioned by the Church. Related to boose.

NounEdit

bastard ‎(plural bastards)

  1. A person who was born out of wedlock, and hence often considered an illegitimate descendant.
    • Television program The Big Valley, 1965
      Jarrod: Who are you?
      Heath: Your father's bastard son.
  2. A mongrel. A biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties.
  3. (vulgar, referring to a man) A contemptible, inconsiderate, overly or arrogantly rude or spiteful person. See asshole, sod.
    Some bastard stole my car while I was helping an injured person.
    Jesus you are a cold bastard, you know that?
    • 1997, South Park television program
      "Oh my God, they killed Kenny!" "You bastards!"
  4. (often humorous) A man, a fellow, a male friend.
    lucky bastard, poor bastard
    Get over here, you old bastard!
  5. (often preceded by 'poor') A person deserving of pity.
    Poor bastard, I feel so sorry for him.
    These poor bastards started out life probably in bad or broken homes.
  6. (informal) A child who does not know his or her father.
  7. (informal) Something extremely difficult or unpleasant to deal with.
    Life can be a real bastard.
  8. A variation that is not genuine; something irregular or inferior or of dubious origin, fake or counterfeit.
    The architecture was a kind of bastard, suggesting Gothic but not being true Gothic.
    • 1622, Francis Bacon, Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry VII, Cambridge University Press (1902), page 62:
      There were also made good and politic laws that parliament, against usury, which is the bastard use of money...
  9. An intermediate-grade file; also bastard file.
  10. A sweet wine.
    • William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure:
      We shall have all the world drink brown and white bastard.
  11. A sword that is midway in length between a short-sword and a long sword; also bastard sword.
  12. An inferior quality of soft brown sugar, obtained from syrups that have been boiled several times.
  13. A large mould for straining sugar.
  14. A writing paper of a particular size.
  15. (Britain, politics, pejorative) A Eurosceptic Conservative MP, especially in the government of John Major.
    • 2000, Peter Hobday, Managing the message, Allison & Busby
      If you are a politician, you make sure that you know all such references in case an interviewer suddenly asks, 'Are you one of the bastards in Mr Major's cabinet?'
    • 2011, Duncan Hall, A2 Government and Politics: Ideologies and Ideologies in Action, Lulu.com (ISBN 9781447733997), page 62
      While John Major managed to get the Maastricht Treaty through parliament, despite the efforts of the “bastards” in his cabinet, the 2001 Conservative General Election campaign was fought on entirely eurosceptic lines.
    • 2014, Melvin J. Lasky, Profanity, Obscenity and the Media, Transaction Publishers (ISBN 9781412832014)
      One “bastard,”, the Minister for Wales, John Redwood (who mounted an unsuccessful campaign to displace the Tory chief, John Major), was removed in a Cabinet reshuffle; but was his young successor William Hague any more reliable?

Usage notesEdit

  • (one born to unmarried parents): Not always regarded as a (religious) stigma (in canon law prohibitive for clerical office without papal indult): Norman duke William, the Conqueror of England, is referred to in state documents as "William the Bastard"; a Burgundian prince was even officially styled Great Bastard of Burgundy.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdjectiveEdit

bastard ‎(comparative more bastard, superlative most bastard)

  1. of or like a bastard (illegitimate human descendant)
  2. of or like a bastard (bad person)
  3. of or like a mongrel, bastardized creature/cross
  4. of abnormal, irregular or otherwise inferior qualities (size, shape etc.)
    a bastard musket; a bastard culverin
  5. spurious, lacking authenticity: counterfeit, fake
    • Barrow
      that bastard self-love which is so vicious in itself, and productive of so many vices
  6. (Britain, vulgar) Very unpleasant.
    I've got a bastard headache.
  7. (printing) Abbreviated, as the half title in a page preceding the full title page of a book.
  8. (theater lighting) Consisting of one predominant color blended with small amounts of complementary color; used to replicate natural light because of their warmer appearance.
    A bastard orange gel produces predominantly orange light with undertones of blue.

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bastard!

  1. (rare, vulgar) Exclamation of strong dismay or strong sense of being upset.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

bastard ‎(third-person singular simple present bastards, present participle bastarding, simple past and past participle bastarded)

  1. (obsolete) To bastardize.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

ReferencesEdit

  • bastard” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • mongrel” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit



DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bastard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bastard/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀd̥] or IPA(key): /bastar/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀ]

NounEdit

bastard c (singular definite bastarden, plural indefinite bastarder)

  1. crossbreed (an organism produced by mating of individuals of different varieties or breeds)
  2. mongrel (someone of mixed kind or uncertain origin, especially a dog)
  3. (dated) bastard (person who was born out of wedlock)

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Middle English bastard, from Old French bastard.

NounEdit

bastard m ‎(genitive singular bastaird, nominative plural bastaird)

  1. bastard

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bastard bhastard mbastard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • "bastard" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • bastard” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bastard, from Late Latin bastardus.

NounEdit

bastard m (plural bastars, feminine singular bastarde, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard (child born outside of wedlock)

AdjectiveEdit

bastard m ‎(feminine singular bastarde, masculine plural bastars, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin bastardus, of Germanic origin, possibly Frankish.

NounEdit

bastard m ‎(oblique plural bastarz or bastartz, nominative singular bastarz or bastartz, nominative plural bastard)

  1. bastard (person conceived to unmarried parents)
    • 12th Century, Unknown, Raoul de Cambrai:
      Vos savez bien qe je sui de bas lin, [e]t sui bastars
      You know well that I am of low birth, and I am a bastard
  2. (pejorative, usually vocative) bastard (insult)

AdjectiveEdit

bastard m ‎(oblique and nominative feminine singular bastarde)

  1. bastard (conceived by unmarried parents)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

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