bastard

See also: Bastard

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bastard, bastarde, from Anglo-Norman bastard (illegitimate child), from Frankish *bāst (marriage) (probably via Medieval Latin bastardus; compare Middle Dutch bast (lust, heat)) and derogatory suffix -ard (pejorative agent noun suffix), from Proto-Germanic *banstuz (bond, tie) (compare West Frisian boask, boaste (marriage)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind); or equivalent to bast +‎ -ard. Cognate with French bâtard (bastard), West Frisian bastert (bastard), Dutch bastaard (bastard), German Bastard (bastard), Icelandic bastarður (bastard). Probably originally referred to a child from a polygynous marriage of heathen Germanic custom — a practice not sanctioned by the Christian churches. Related to boose.

Alternatively, the Old French form may originate from the term fils de bast (packsaddle son), meaning a child conceived on an improvised bed (medieval saddles often doubled as beds while traveling).

NounEdit

bastard (plural bastards)

  1. A person who was born out of wedlock, and hence often considered an illegitimate descendant.
    Synonyms: love child, born in the vestry, illegitimate; see also Thesaurus:bastard
    • 1965, The Big Valley
      Jarrod: Who are you?
      Heath: Your father's bastard son.
  2. A mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties).
  3. (vulgar or derogatory, typically referring to a man) A contemptible, inconsiderate, overly or arrogantly rude or spiteful person.
    Synonyms: son of a bitch, arsehole, asshole; see also Thesaurus:git, Thesaurus:jerk
    Some bastard stole my car while I was helping an injured person.
    • 1997, South Park television program
      "Oh my God, they killed Kenny!" "You bastards!"
  4. (often humorous) A man, a fellow, a male friend.
    lucky bastard
    poor bastard
    Get over here, you old bastard!
  5. (often preceded by 'poor') A person deserving of pity.
    Poor bastard, I feel so sorry for him.
    These poor bastards started out life probably in bad or broken homes.
  6. (informal) A child who does not know his or her father.
  7. (informal) Something extremely difficult or unpleasant to deal with.
    Life can be a real bastard.
  8. A variation that is not genuine; something irregular or inferior or of dubious origin, fake or counterfeit.
    The architecture was a kind of bastard, suggesting Gothic but not being true Gothic.
    • 1622, Francis Bacon, Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry VII, Cambridge University Press (1902), page 62:
      There were also made good and politic laws that parliament, against usury, which is the bastard use of money...
  9. A bastard file.
  10. A sweet wine.
  11. A sword that is midway in length between a short-sword and a long sword; also bastard sword.
  12. An inferior quality of soft brown sugar, obtained from syrups that have been boiled several times.
  13. A large mould for straining sugar.
  14. A writing paper of a particular size.

Usage notesEdit

  • (one born to unmarried parents): Not always regarded as a stigma (though it is one in e.g. canon law, prohibitive for clerical office without papal indult): Norman duke William, the Conqueror of England, is referred to in state documents as "William the Bastard"; a Burgundian prince was even officially styled Great Bastard of Burgundy.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

bastard (comparative more bastard, superlative most bastard)

  1. Of or like a bastard (illegitimate human descendant).
  2. Of or like a bastard (bad person).
  3. Of or like a mongrel, bastardized creature/cross.
  4. Of abnormal, irregular or otherwise inferior qualities (size, shape etc).
    a bastard musket
    a bastard culverin
  5. Spurious, lacking authenticity: counterfeit, fake.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Self-conceit (sermon)
      that bastard self-love which is so vicious in itself, and productive of so many vices
  6. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (of a language) imperfect; not spoken or written well or in the classical style; broken.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      Of what race could these people be? Their language was a bastard Arabic, and yet they were not Arabs; I was quite sure of that.
  7. Used in the vernacular name of a species to indicate that it is similar in some way to another species, often (but not always) one of another genus.
  8. (Britain, vulgar) Very unpleasant.
    I've got a bastard headache.
  9. (printing) Abbreviated, as the half title in a page preceding the full title page of a book.
  10. (theater lighting) Consisting of one predominant color blended with small amounts of complementary color; used to replicate natural light because of their warmer appearance.
    A bastard orange gel produces predominantly orange light with undertones of blue.

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bastard!

  1. (rare) Exclamation of strong dismay or strong sense of being upset.
    • 2001, Stephen King, “The Death of Jack Hamilton”, in Everything's Eventual, Simon and Schuster (2007), →ISBN, page 90:
      Jack says, “Oh! Bastard! I’m hit!” That bullet had to have come in the busted back window and how it missed Johnnie to hit Jack I don’t know.
    • 2004, Cecelia Ahern, PS, I Love You (novel), Hyperion, →ISBN, page 7:
      “Yes, I’m hhhhowwwwwwcch!” she yelped as she stubbed her toe against the bedpost. “Shit, shit, fuck, bastard, shit, crap!”
    • 2006, Emily Franklin, Love from London, Penguin, →ISBN, page 212:
      “Isn’t she lovely?” Clem asks, hopefully rhetorically. “Oh, bastard. I’ve got to go—that’s my signal. []

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

bastard (third-person singular simple present bastards, present participle bastarding, simple past and past participle bastarded)

  1. (obsolete) To bastardize.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit


AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Occitan bastard.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bastard (feminine bastarda, masculine plural bastards, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. illegitimate (born out of wedlock)
  2. adulterated

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

bastard m (plural bastards, feminine bastarda)

  1. bastard (child born out of wedlock)

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbastart]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧s‧tard

NounEdit

bastard m anim

  1. bastard, love child (person born to unmarried parents)
    Synonym: levoboček
  2. bastard, mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties)
  3. bastard, asshole

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bastard in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bastard in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bastard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bastard/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀd̥]
  • IPA(key): /bastar/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀ]

NounEdit

bastard c (singular definite bastarden, plural indefinite bastarder)

  1. crossbreed (an organism produced by mating of individuals of different varieties or breeds)
    Synonyms: hybrid, krydsning
  2. mongrel (someone of mixed kind or uncertain origin, especially a dog)
  3. (dated) bastard (person who was born out of wedlock)

InflectionEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle English bastard, from Old French bastard.

NounEdit

bastard m (genitive singular bastaird, nominative plural bastaird)

  1. bastard

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bastard bhastard mbastard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman bastard; equivalent to bast (illegitimacy) +‎ -ard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbastard/, /ˈbastaːrd/, /ˈbastərd/

NounEdit

bastard (plural bastardes)

  1. an illegitimate child, especially a noble one; a bastard
  2. a kind of fortified wine, often with spices added
  3. (rare) a heretic or sinner; one separated from one's deity
  4. (rare) a dog that isn't purebred; a mutt or mongrel
  5. (rare) a botanical tendril or offshoot

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: bastard
  • Scots: bastart, bastert

ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bastard

  1. coming not from wedlock, coming from bastardy; illegitimate
  2. low-quality, inferior, imitation; of bad manufacture
  3. (rare) not purebred; of mixed lineage
  4. (rare) made using or incorporating fortified wine
  5. (rare) wrong, erroneous, incorrect

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bastard, from Late Latin bastardus.

NounEdit

bastard m (plural bastars, feminine singular bastarde, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard (child born outside of wedlock)

AdjectiveEdit

bastard m (feminine singular bastarde, masculine plural bastars, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin bastardus, of Germanic origin, possibly Frankish.

NounEdit

bastard m (oblique plural bastarz or bastartz, nominative singular bastarz or bastartz, nominative plural bastard)

  1. bastard (person conceived to unmarried parents)
    • 12th Century, Unknown, Raoul de Cambrai:
      Vos savez bien qe je sui de bas lin, [e]t sui bastars
      You know well that I am of low birth, and I am a bastard
  2. (derogatory, usually vocative) bastard (insult)

AdjectiveEdit

bastard m (oblique and nominative feminine singular bastarde)

  1. bastard (conceived by unmarried parents)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian bastardo.

NounEdit

bastard m (plural bastarzi)

  1. bastard

DeclensionEdit