bandolier

EnglishEdit

 
Mexican Revolutionary General Pancho Villa wearing two bandoliers.
 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier form bandollier, from Middle French bandoulliere, from Catalan bandolera, feminine derivative of bandoler (member of a band of men), from bàndol (band).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌbændəˈlɪə(ɹ)/

NounEdit

bandolier (plural bandoliers)

  1. An ammunition belt, worn over the shoulder, having loops or pockets for cartridges.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 32, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      The vivid, untrammeled life appealed to him […]; but he was wise and knew that once peace was established there would be no room in Cuba for the Sin Verguenza.
        “None better to face peril or adversity with, but a change is coming, and one cannot always wear the bandolier,” he said.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury, 2005, Chapter 3,
      [] with the casual but combative look of the urban photographer, black T-shirt and baseball boots, twenty-pocketed waistcoat and bandolier of film.
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