barbarism

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɑː(ɹ)bəɹɪz(ə)m/
  • (General American) enPR: bärʹbə-rĭz'm, IPA(key): /ˈbɑɹbəˈɹɪzm̩/
  • (file)

NounEdit

barbarism (countable and uncountable, plural barbarisms)

  1. A barbaric act.
    These barbarisms can not be allowed to continue; they must be crushed or civilization will collapse.
  2. The condition of existing barbarically.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume II, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), OCLC 630079698, pages 42–43:
      Like dancing, it is a remnant of ancient barbarism—fit for the days of the Chaldeans or the Babylonians, when people were only amused through their eyes—the sole entertainment of which savage nations are susceptible.
    • 1879, William Tecumseh Sherman, Address to the Michigan Military Academy:
      War is at best barbarism... Its glory is all moonshine.
  3. A word hybridizing Ancient Greek and Latin or other heterogeneous roots.
  4. An error in language use within a single word, such as a mispronunciation.
    • 2002, Hyman, Bad Grammar in Context, New England Classical Journal, 29, p. 94-101
      In the jargon of the ancient grammarian, penacilin would be a barbarism.

TranslationsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French barbarisme.

NounEdit

barbarism n (plural barbarisme)

  1. barbarism

DeclensionEdit