battement

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French battement (beating, hitting).

NounEdit

battement (plural battements)

  1. (ballet) A ballet move involving a beating action with an extended leg
    • 1894, Arthur Machen, Memoirs of Casanova[1]:
      [] he raised slowly his rounded arms, stretched them gracefully backward and forward, moved his feet with precision and lightness, took a few small steps, made some battements and pirouettes, and disappeared like a butterfly.
    • 1988 March 11, Dorothy Samachson, “Chicago Repertory Dance Ensemble”, in Chicago Reader[2]:
      Ernst and Watson are superb dancers--extraordinarily agile and acrobatic, and their unison spins, battements, and body lines showed a split-second timing.
  2. (obsolete) A thumping or beating sensation
    • 1796, Erasmus Darwin, Zoonomia, Vol. I[3]:
      Secondly, though there is an audible vertigo, as is known by the battement, or undulations of sound in the ears, which many vertiginous people experience [] .

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

battre +‎ -ment.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

battement m (plural battements)

  1. beating; hitting
    battement du cœur
    beating of the heart
  2. (ballet) battement

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

battement m (plural battements)

  1. (Jersey, medicine) heartbeat