befraud

EnglishEdit

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Please see that page for discussion and justifications beyond the initial comment of: "This appears to be an uncommon mistake for defraud, not in dictionaries.". Feel free to edit this entry as normal, though do not remove the {{rfd}} until the debate has finished.

EtymologyEdit

From be- +‎ fraud.

VerbEdit

befraud (third-person singular simple present befrauds, present participle befrauding, simple past and past participle befrauded)

  1. (transitive, rare, nonstandard) Synonym of defraud.
    • 1934, Albert Ernest Croft, Conditioning Buyer Personality:
      Her new experiences were to change her habits of consumption further and to make her more susceptible to the befrauding frills that she could now afford, but which would exploit her.
    • 1970, Missouri Historical Society, The Bulletin, volume 27, page 113:
      Then I believed I had learned to know the measure of earthly suffering; but all sufferings of the world are nothing compared to the sufferings of the befrauded German emigrants in North America.
    • 1987, Moshe Zimmermann, Wilhelm Marr: The Patriarch of Anti-Semitism, page 104:
      You talk ceaselessly about the 'fraud of 'those who make a business out of anti-Semitism.' Who is befrauding? In what manner?
    • 1991, Richard Dien Winfield, Freedom and Modernity, page 121:
      Therefore, it is always possible for persons to enter into conflicts of nonmalicious wrong when they disagree over what factors are the rightful property they have recognized, to befraud one another by using the contractual form of reciprocal recognition to acquire property through misrepresentation, and finally to commit crimes by simply choosing to violate openly the property rights of others.
    • 1996, Emil Klauprecht, Steven Rowan, Cincinnati, Or, The Mysteries of the West:
      Vitelleschi, an invaluable friend who had emerged so unexpectedly, had kept his promises to the letter, ruining that fearsome woman he had befrauded, along with his competitor Filson, had won Johanna for him, whose possession had become a point of pride.
    • 2000, T. R. S. Sharma, C. K. Seshdri, June Gaur, Ancient Indian Literature: Tamil and Kannada, page 875:
      When grown up, once he went on a voyage in the company of his younger step-brother, who befrauded and deserted him twice over on a lonely island.

AnagramsEdit