See also: Borax and bórax

EnglishEdit

 
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Borax

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English boras, from Anglo-Norman boreis, from Medieval Latin baurach (borax), from Arabic بَوْرَق(bawraq), from Middle Persian bwlk' (bōrag), which yielded Persian بوره(bure).

NounEdit

borax (uncountable)

  1. A white or gray/grey crystalline salt, with a slight alkaline taste, used as a flux, in soldering metals, making enamels, fixing colors/colours on porcelain, and as a soap, etc.
  2. (chemistry) The sodium salt of boric acid, Na2B4O7, either anhydrous or with 5 or 10 molecules of water of crystallisation; sodium tetraborate.
  3. (sometimes attributive) Cheap or tawdry furniture or other works of industrial design.
    • 1977, Harlan Ellison, Jeffty is Five
      Furniture isn't made to last thirty years or longer because they took a survey and found that young homemakers like to throw their furniture out and bring in all new, color-coded borax every seven years.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

borax (third-person singular simple present boraxes, present participle boraxing, simple past and past participle boraxed)

  1. (transitive) To treat with borax.

Further readingEdit

  • David Barthelmy (1997–2021), “Borax”, in Webmineral Mineralogy Database.
  • borax”, in Mindat.org[1], Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, 2000–2021.
  • borax at the Free Dictionary

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French borax

NounEdit

borax n (uncountable)

  1. borax

DeclensionEdit