BourguignonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor.

NounEdit

côr m (plural côrs)

  1. heart

Franco-ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor.

NounEdit

côr m (plural côrs)

  1. heart

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin chorus, from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós, dance, chorus, choir).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

côr m (plural côrs)

  1. choir

SynonymsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

côr f (plural côres)

  1. Obsolete spelling of cor (used in Portugal from 1911 to 1945 and in Brazil from 1943 to 1971).

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin chorus, from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós).

NounEdit

côr m or f (plural corau)

    1. choir in a church, host of angels, company of bards; assembly, council; tribe, host; religious community; choir, choral society
    2. (Christianity) a society that was both a convent and a seminary, conventual college
    3. faculty, profession
  1. crib, stall
    1. pew (in a church or chapel), stall, box (in a theatre, etc.)
    2. reading-pew, lectern
  2. song
  3. chancel, choir, sanctuary; court; circle, compass, range
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Semantic loan from English quire, falsely interpreted in the sense ‘choir’.

NounEdit

côr m (plural corau)

  1. quire (of paper)

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
côr gôr nghôr chôr
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “côr”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies