EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A minced oath or dialectal variant of God.

InterjectionEdit

cor

  1. (Cockney Britain) Expression of surprise.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter VII:
      “I don’t get this,” she said. “How do you mean it’s gone?” “It’s been pinched.” “Things don’t get pinched in country-houses.” “They do if there’s a Wilbert Cream on the premises. He’s a klep-whatever-it-is,” I said, and thrust Jeeves’s letter on her. She perused it with an interested eye and having mastered its contents said, “Cor chase my Aunt Fanny up a gum tree,” adding that you never knew what was going to happen next these days.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Biblical Hebrew כֹּר(kōr)

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

cor (plural cors)

  1. (historical units of measure) Various former units of volume, particularly:
    1. A Hebrew unit of liquid volume, about equal to 230 L or 60 gallons.
    2. Synonym of homer: approximately the same volume as a dry measure.
    3. A roughly equivalent Phoenician unit of volume.
SynonymsEdit
MeronymsEdit
  • (liquid volume): log (1720 cor); cab, kab (1180 cor); hin (160 cor); bath (110 cor)
  • (dry volume): See homer

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan cor, from Latin cor, from Proto-Italic *kord, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr ~ *ḱr̥d-.

NounEdit

cor m (plural cors)

  1. heart
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
Suits in Catalan · colls (layout · text)
       
cors diamants piques trèvols

Etymology 2Edit

Probably borrowed from Latin chorus (14th century), from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós).

NounEdit

cor m (plural cors)

  1. chorus

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cor, corn, from Latin cornu, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (plural cors)

  1. horn (musical instrument)
  2. corn (of the foot)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese coor (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin color, colōrem.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈkoɾ], [ˈkoːɾ]

NounEdit

cor f (plural cores)

  1. color, hue
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese cor (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin cor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (plural cores)

  1. (archaic) heart
    Synonym: corazón
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (plural cores)

  1. Alternative form of calor

ReferencesEdit

  • cor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • coor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • coor” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • cor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • cor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • cor” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cor (act of putting), verbal noun of fo·ceird (to put).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (genitive singular coir, nominative plural cora or coranna)

  1. twist, turn, turning movement
  2. (fishing) cast; haul from cast
  3. (music) lively turn; lively air
  4. (dance) reel

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

cor m (genitive singular coir, nominative plural coir)

  1. agreement, contract; guarantee, pledge

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

cor m (genitive singular coir)

  1. verbal noun of coir
  2. tiredness, exhaustion

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

cor (present analytic corann, future analytic corfaidh, verbal noun coradh, past participle cortha)

  1. turn

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cor chor gcor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


IstriotEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor. Cognate with Catalan cor.

NounEdit

cor m

  1. heart

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

cor m (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of cuore
    • c. 1314, Dante, Inferno 1.13–15:
      Ma poi ch’i’ fui al piè d’un colle giunto, / là dove terminava quella valle / che m’avea di paura il cor compunto, …
      But then, when I had reached the foot of a hill, / there where that valley ended / which had pierced my heart with fear, …

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *kord, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr ~ *ḱr̥d-. Cognate with Ancient Greek καρδίᾱ (kardíā), Proto-Germanic *hertô, Sanskrit हृदय (hṛdaya), Hittite 𒆠𒅕 (kir), Proto-Slavic *sьrdьce (heart).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor n (genitive cordis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) heart
  2. (figuratively) soul, mind

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cor corda
Genitive cordis cordium
cordum
Dative cordī cordibus
Accusative cor corda
Ablative corde cordibus
Vocative cor corda

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • cor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • I am gradually convinced that..: addūcor, ut credam
    • to plunge a dagger, knife in some one's heart: sicam, cultrum in corde alicuius defigere (Liv. 1. 58)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cornu.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cor)

  1. horn (instrument used to produce sound)

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *koros (casting, a throw), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (genitive cuir, no plural)

  1. verbal noun of fo·ceird

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative cor
Vocative cuir
Accusative corN
Genitive cuirL
Dative corL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cor chor cor
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor.

NounEdit

cor m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cor)

  1. heart (organ which pumps blood)
  2. heart (metaphorically, human emotion)
    • circa 1145, Bernard de Ventadour, Tant ai mo cor ple de joya:
      Tant ai mo cor ple de joya
      My heart is so full of joy

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese coor, from Latin color, colōrem, from Old Latin colos (covering), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, conceal).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈkoʁ/, [ˈkoh]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /ˈkoɾ/, [ˈkoɾ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈkoʁ/, [ˈkoχ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈkoɾ/, [ˈkoɾ]

NounEdit

cor f (plural cores)

  1. colour (Commonwealth English), color (American English)
QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:cor.

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin cor.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈkɔʁ/, [ˈkɔh]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /ˈkɔɾ/, [ˈkɔɾ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈkɔʁ/, [ˈkɔχ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈkɔɾ/, [ˈkɔɾ]

NounEdit

cor m (plural cores)

  1. heart
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Colors in Portuguese · cores (layout · text)
     branco, alvo, cândido      cinza, gris,
cinzento
     preto, negro, atro
             vermelho,
salmão,
encarnado, rubro; carmim
             laranja,
cor-de-laranja; castanho,
marrom
             amarelo; creme,
ocre
             verde-limão              verde, verde claro              verde-água,
menta
             ciano,
turquesa; azul-petróleo
             azul céu,
azul-celeste
             azul
             violeta,
lilás; índigo,
anil
             magenta; roxo, púrpura              rosa,
cor-de-rosa,pink

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Greek χορός (chorós, dance), or borrowed from Latin chorus, Italian coro, German Chor.

NounEdit

cor n (plural coruri)

  1. choir, chorus (group of singers)
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin chorus, from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós).

NounEdit

cor n (plural coruri)

  1. a gathering, circle, society
  2. a bunch of hay arranged in squares or circles for making haybales
DeclensionEdit
See alsoEdit

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor.

NounEdit

cor m (plural cors)

  1. (anatomy) heart

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cor (act of putting, placing; setting up, etc.; act of throwing, casting; act of letting go, discarding; leap, twist; throw (in wrestling); twist, coil; twist, detour, circuit in road, etc.; tune, melody; contract; surety, guarantor; act of overthrowing, defeating; defeat, reverse; state, condition, plight; act of tiring; tiredness, fatigue), verbal noun of fo·ceird (sets, puts, places; throws, casts; casts down, overthrows; puts forth, emits, sends out; launches; utters, makes; raises (a shout, cry); performs, executes, wages).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (genitive singular coir or cuir)

  1. condition, state
    Dè do chor?How are you?
    (literally: "what's your condition?")
  2. condition, eventuality, circumstance
    air chor sam bithon any condition, on any account
    air chor 's guon condition that
    (cf also derived terms)
  3. method, manner
  4. custom
  5. surety
  6. term or condition of a treaty
  7. progress

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cor chor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “cor”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 cor”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

NounEdit

cor m (plural cori)

  1. heart

Related termsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *korr (compare Old Cornish cor, Middle Breton corr).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cor m (plural corrod)

  1. dwarf, pygmy, little urchin
  2. spider; shrew

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cor gor nghor chor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cor”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

ZazakiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Northern Kurdish jor.

NounEdit

cor ?

  1. top (uppermost part)