catchphrase

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From catch +‎ phrase, from the notion that the phrase will catch in the mind of the user.

NounEdit

catchphrase (plural catchphrases)

  1. A repeated expression, often originating in popular culture.
    • 2005 May 14, “Disney's Tigger voice dies at 82”, in BBC News website[1]:
      For Tigger, he created a slight lisp and laugh, crediting his British wife with Tigger's "TTFN" catchprase - "ta-ta for now", itself coming from BBC radio comedy It's That Man Again.
    • 2018 September 18, Brian Logan, “Catchphrase comedy is dead. Am I bovvered?”, in The Guardian[2]:
      The former head of BBC comedy claims catchphrases are out of fashion. But as Corporal Jones might say, ‘Don’t panic!’
  2. A signature phrase of a particular person or group.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

TriviaEdit

This is one of the few common words in English with six consonant letters in a row. Others include latchstring and watchstrap.