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EnglishEdit

 
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An illustration of chromosome, with its parts. (1) Chromatid. One of the two identical parts of the chromosome after S phase. (2) Centromere. The point where the two chromatids touch, and where the microtubules attach. (3) Short arm (4) Long arm.

EtymologyEdit

19th century: from German Chromosom, ultimately from Ancient Greek χρῶμα (khrôma, colour) + σῶμα (sôma, body) (because they are stained under the microscope).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɹəʊ.məˌsəʊm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɹoʊməˌsoʊm/, /ˈkɹoʊməˌzoʊm/
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NounEdit

chromosome (plural chromosomes)

  1. (cytology, genetics) A linear arrangement of condensed DNA and associated proteins (such as chaperone proteins) which contains the genetic material (genome) of an organism.
    Chromosomes store genetic information.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

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Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

19th century: chromo- +‎ -some, from German Chromosom, ultimately from Ancient Greek χρῶμα (khrôma, colour) + σῶμα (sôma, body) (because they are stained under the microscope).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chromosome m (plural chromosomes)

  1. (biology, cytology) chromosome

HyponymsEdit

MeronymsEdit

HolonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit