cloc

Contents

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

cloc

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of cloure

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Late Latin clocca ‎(bell), from Proto-Indo-European *kleg- ‎(to cry, sound).

NounEdit

cloc m

  1. bell
  2. (by extension) clock

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cloc” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • Rudolf Thurneysen, A Grammar of Old Irish (Dublin, 1946), p. 87

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

cloc m ‎(genitive singular cloca, plural clocan or clocaichean)

  1. Alternative form of gleoc

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cloc m (plural clociau)

  1. clock

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cloc gloc nghloc chloc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Read in another language