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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clag (uncountable)

  1. A glue or paste made from starch.
  2. Low cloud, fog or smog.
    • 1993, Harry Furniss, Memoirs - One: The Flying Game
      The sky was thick with dirty gray clag
    • 2001, Colin Castle, Lucky Alex: The Career of Group Captain A.M. Jardine Afc, CD, Seaman and Airman
      This programme included practice interceptions, simulator training, day flying, night flying, clag flying -- in addition to [] [a footnote states that clag flying was Air Force slang for foul weather flying.]
    • 2004, David A. Barr, One Lucky Canuck: An Autobiography
      We went along in the clag for what seemed like an eternity [a footnote defines clag as low cloud cover]
  3. (railway slang) Unburned carbon (smoke) from a steam or diesel locomotive, or multiple unit.
  4. (motor racing slang) Bits of rubber which are shed from tires during a race and collect off the racing line, especially on the outside of corners.
    He ran wide in the corner, hit the clag and spun off.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

clag (third-person singular simple present clags, present participle clagging, simple past and past participle clagged)

  1. (obsolete) To encumber
    • c1620:Thomas Heywood, Thomas Heywood's Art of Love: The First Complete English Translation of Ovid's Ars Amatoria
      As when the orchard boughes are clag'd with fruite
    • 1725: Edward Taylor, Preparatory Meditations
      Can such draw to me/My stund affections all with Cinders clag'd
  2. To stick, like boots in mud
    • 1999: "A queen of a Santee kitchen, pre-war", quoted by Mary Alston Read Simms in the Introduction to Rice Planter and Sportsman: The Recollections of J. Motte Alston, 1821-1909
      Wash the rice well in two waters, if you don't wash 'em, 'e will clag [clag means get sticky] and put 'em in a pot of well-salted boiling water.

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cloc, from Proto-Indo-European *kleg- (to cry, sound).

NounEdit

clag m (genitive singular cluig, plural cluig)

  1. bell

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
clag chlag glag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cloc, from Proto-Indo-European *kleg- (to cry, sound).

NounEdit

clag m (genitive singular cluig, plural cluig)

  1. bell

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
clag chlag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.