columba

See also: Columba

LatinEdit

 
columba (a dove)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κόλυμβος (kólumbos, a diver), from κολυμβάω (kolumbáō, dive, plunge headlong, swim). (Aristophanes [Birds, 304] and others use the word κολυμβίς (kolumbís, diver, sea-bird)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

columba f (genitive columbae); first declension (masculine columbus)

  1. dove, pigeon (sacred bird of Venus)
  2. a term of endearment

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative columba columbae
Genitive columbae columbārum
Dative columbae columbīs
Accusative columbam columbās
Ablative columbā columbīs
Vocative columba columbae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • columba”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • columba”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • columba in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • columba in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • columba”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin columba.

NounEdit

columba f (plural columbas)

  1. dove, pigeon