See also: venus, Venüs, Vénus, and Vênus

Translingual

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Venus subrostrata
 
The Birth of Venus

Etymology

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Latin, after Venus (goddess of beauty, love, sexual intercourse). See images.

Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Veneridae – typical venus clams.

Hypernyms

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Hyponyms

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References

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English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Venus's planetary symbol

Etymology

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From Middle English Venus, from Latin Venus.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus (plural Venuses)

  1. (astronomy) The second planet in the Solar system, named for the goddess; represented in astronomy and astrology by .
    • The Illustrated London Almanack 1867, London, page 45:
      Venus rises on the 1st day 1/4 to 5 a.m., and 4h. 25m. a.m. on the last day. [...] She is now beginning to move northward. [...]
  2. (Roman mythology) The goddess of love, beauty, fertility, and sexuality; the Roman counterpart of Aphrodite.
    • 1888 June 2, “Senoritas of Brazil. [Chicago Mail.]”, in The Cincinnati Enquirer, volume XLVI, number 154, page 13, column 3:
      Their figures are universally models for brunette Venuses, and their feet arch like rainbows, and are Cinderellian in size.
  3. A female given name

Synonyms

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  • (astronomy, astrology):

Derived terms

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Translations

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See also

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Solar System in English · Solar System (layout · text)
Star Sun
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Mercury Venus Earth Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
Moon Phobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganymede
Callisto
Mimas
Enceladus
Tethys
Dione
Rhea
Titan
Iapetus

Miranda
Ariel
Umbriel
Titania
Oberon
Triton Charon Dysnomia

Noun

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Venus (sense 2) of Willendorf

Venus (countable and uncountable, plural Venuses)

  1. (obsolete or poetry) Sexual activity or intercourse, sex; lust, love.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC:
      , II.ii.2:
      Immoderate Venus in excess, as it is a cause, or in defect; so, moderately used, to some parties an only help, a present remedy.
  2. (obsolete, alchemy, chemistry) Copper (a reddish-brown, malleable, ductile metallic element).
    • 1807, A New and Complete Encyclopaedia; or, Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences: Vol III[2], page 48:
      CRYSTALS of Venus or of copper, called also vitriol of Venus, is copper reduced into the form of vitriol by spirit of nitre, or by dissolving verdegris in good distilled vinegar, till the acid be saturated; it is very caustic and used to eat off proud flesh. It is also used by painters, and manufacturers, and sold under the name of distilled vinegar. See CHEMISTRY.
    • 2004, Maurice P. Crosland, Historical Studies in the Language of Chemistry[3], page 89:
      Another pair of terms which caused some confusion were Spirit of Saturn and Spirit of Venus, names suggesting compounds of lead and copper respectively. Jean Beguin described the preparation from minium and distilled vinegar of a liquid he called burning spirit of Saturn, e cause it was inflammable and he thought it was a compound of lead. Actually the lead takes no part in the reaction and the product of distilling lead acetate is impure acetone. Beguin’s terminology did not go without comment however, for Christopher Glaser later referred to ‘A burning Spirit of Saturn (as it is called) but rather, a Spirit of the Volatile Salt of Vinegar’. Tachenius referred to the product of distillation of copper acetate as ‘pretended spirit of Venus’ because it was really only distilled vinegar - the meaning which Macquer gave to the expression. It is typical of the confusion of terminology in early chemistry that the London Pharmacopoeia of 1721 gave the name Spiritus Veneris to sulphuric acid obtained by the distillation of copper sulphate.
    • 2013, John Read, From Alchemy to Chemistry[4]:
      The association of the heavenly bodies with known metals and also with human organs and destinies goes back to ancient Chaldea, the land of astrologers. In Chaucer’s words: ‘The seven bodies eek, lo hear anon. Sol gold is, and Luna silver we declare; Mars yron, Mercurie is quyksilver; Saturnian leed; and Jubitur is tyn, and Venus coper, by my fathers kyn.’ […] Corresponding names were bestowed upon salts of these metals by the alchemists, and some of them have persisted down to the present day. Some examples are lunar caustic (silver nitrate); vitriol of Venus (copper sulphate); sugar of Saturn (lead acetate); and vitriol of Mars, or Martial vitriol (ferrous sulphate).
  3. Any Upper Palaeolithic statuette portraying a woman, usually carved in the round.
    • 1986, Brian Hayden, “Old Europe: sacred matriarchy or complementary opposition?”, in Anthony Bonanno, editor, Archaeology and Fertility Cult in the Ancient Mediterranean: Papers Presented at the First International Conference on Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean, University of Malta, 2–5 September 1985, Amsterdam: B.R. Grüner Publishing Co., →ISBN, section I (Prehistory), page 23:
      While the goddess statues obviously did function in a very public, domestic context, there is no evidence that they were androgynyous or that they were the primary cult of importance. There are probably just as many phalli in the Paleolithic as there are Venuses.
    • 1990, D. Bruce Dickson, “An Interpretation”, in The Dawn of Belief: Religion in the Upper Paleolithic of Southwestern Europe, Tucson, Ariz.: The University of Arizona Press, published 1996, →ISBN, page 211:
      However, a number of well-crafted studies in recent years have forcefully questioned—and perhaps refuted—the view that the Venuses were simply or solely goddesses.
    • 2016, Jean Clottes, “Perceptions of the World, Functions of the Art, and the Artists”, in Oliver Y. Martin, Robert D. Martin, transl., What Is Paleolithic Art?: Cave Paintings and the Dawn of Human Creativity, Chicago, Ill., London: The University of Chicago Press, →ISBN, page 148:
      Her proportions, the stylistic elements, the choice of anatomical elements represented are characteristic of the Aurignacian or Gravettian Venuses, known especially from the statuary of Central and Eastern Europe.

Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch Venus.

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: Ve‧nus

Proper noun

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Venus

  1. (astronomy) Venus
  2. (Roman mythology) Venus

See also

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Asturian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈbenus/, [ˈbe.nus]

Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)

Catalan

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Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. (Roman mythology) Venus (Roman goddess)

See also

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Cebuano

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Etymology

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From English Venus, from Latin.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus

  1. the second planet in our solar system after Mercury
  2. (Roman mythology) the goddess of love, beauty, and natural productivity;
  3. a female given name from Latin

Danish

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Proper noun

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Venus

  1. Venus (planet)

See also

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(planets of the solar system) planeter i solsystemet; Merkur,‎ Venus,‎ Jorden/‎jorden,‎ Mars,‎ Jupiter,‎ Saturn,‎ Uranus,‎ Neptun [edit]

Dutch

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Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)

Estonian

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Proper noun

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Venus

  1. Venus (Roman goddess)

Faroese

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Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)

See also

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Solar System in Faroese · Sólskipanin (layout · text)
Star Sólin
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Merkur Venus Jørðin Mars [Term?] Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptun Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
Mánin Phobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganymedes
Callisto
[Term?]
[Term?]
[Term?]
[Term?]
[Term?]
Titan
[Term?]

[Term?]
[Term?]
[Term?]
[Term?]
[Term?]
Triton Charon Dysnomia

Finnish

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Etymology

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From Latin Venus.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈʋe(ː)nus/, [ˈʋe̞(ː)nus̠]
  • Rhymes: -enus
  • Syllabification(key): Ve‧nus

Proper noun

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Venus

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. Venus (Roman goddess)

Declension

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Inflection of Venus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative Venus
genitive Venuksen
partitive Venusta
illative Venukseen
singular plural
nominative Venus
accusative nom. Venus
gen. Venuksen
genitive Venuksen
partitive Venusta
inessive Venuksessa
elative Venuksesta
illative Venukseen
adessive Venuksella
ablative Venukselta
allative Venukselle
essive Venuksena
translative Venukseksi
abessive Venuksetta
instructive
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of Venus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative Venukseni
accusative nom. Venukseni
gen. Venukseni
genitive Venukseni
partitive Venustani
inessive Venuksessani
elative Venuksestani
illative Venukseeni
adessive Venuksellani
ablative Venukseltani
allative Venukselleni
essive Venuksenani
translative Venuksekseni
abessive Venuksettani
instructive
comitative
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative Venuksesi
accusative nom. Venuksesi
gen. Venuksesi
genitive Venuksesi
partitive Venustasi
inessive Venuksessasi
elative Venuksestasi
illative Venukseesi
adessive Venuksellasi
ablative Venukseltasi
allative Venuksellesi
essive Venuksenasi
translative Venukseksesi
abessive Venuksettasi
instructive
comitative
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative Venuksemme
accusative nom. Venuksemme
gen. Venuksemme
genitive Venuksemme
partitive Venustamme
inessive Venuksessamme
elative Venuksestamme
illative Venukseemme
adessive Venuksellamme
ablative Venukseltamme
allative Venuksellemme
essive Venuksenamme
translative Venukseksemme
abessive Venuksettamme
instructive
comitative
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative Venuksenne
accusative nom. Venuksenne
gen. Venuksenne
genitive Venuksenne
partitive Venustanne
inessive Venuksessanne
elative Venuksestanne
illative Venukseenne
adessive Venuksellanne
ablative Venukseltanne
allative Venuksellenne
essive Venuksenanne
translative Venukseksenne
abessive Venuksettanne
instructive
comitative
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative Venuksensa
accusative nom. Venuksensa
gen. Venuksensa
genitive Venuksensa
partitive Venustaan
Venustansa
inessive Venuksessaan
Venuksessansa
elative Venuksestaan
Venuksestansa
illative Venukseensa
adessive Venuksellaan
Venuksellansa
ablative Venukseltaan
Venukseltansa
allative Venukselleen
Venuksellensa
essive Venuksenaan
Venuksenansa
translative Venuksekseen
Venukseksensa
abessive Venuksettaan
Venuksettansa
instructive
comitative

Derived terms

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compounds

See also

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Solar System in Finnish · Aurinkokunta (layout · text)
Star Aurinko
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Merkurius Venus Maa (Tellus) Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturnus Uranus Neptunus Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
Kuu Phobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganymedes
Kallisto
Mimas
Enceladus
Tethys
Dione
Rhea
Titan
Japetus

Miranda
Ariel
Umbriel
Titania
Oberon
Triton Kharon Dysnomia

Anagrams

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Galician

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Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. Venus (Roman goddess)

See also

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German

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 Venus on German Wikipedia
 
Venus [2] und Amor

Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Latin Venus.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈveːnʊs/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: Ve‧nus

Proper noun

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Venus f (proper noun, genitive Venus)

  1. (astronomy) Venus
  2. (Roman mythology) Venus

Derived terms

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(planet):

Noun

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Venus f (genitive Venus, no plural)

  1. (figuratively) very beautiful woman

Declension

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See also

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References

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Icelandic

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Etymology

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From Latin Venus.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. Venus (Roman goddess)
  3. a female given name

See also

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Solar System in Icelandic · Sólkerfið (layout · text)
Star Sólin
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Merkúr Venus Jörðin Mars Seres Júpíter Satúrnus Úranus Neptúnus Plútó Eris
Notable
moons
Tunglið Fóbos
Deimos
Íó
Evrópa
Ganýmedes
Kallistó
Mímas
Enkeladus
Teþis
Díóne
Rea
Títan
Japetus

Míranda
Aríel
Úmbríel
Títanía
Óberon
Tríton Karon Dysnómía

Latin

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Etymology

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From venus (loveliness), see there for more.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus f (genitive Veneris); third declension

  1. (Roman mythology) Venus (goddess of love and beauty)
  2. (astronomy) Venus (planet)
    Synonym: Lūcifer
  3. (poetic) metaphor for the genus of animation, living matter
    • c. 99 BCE – 55 BCE, Lucretius, De rerum natura 1.1–5:[1]
      Aeneadum genetrīx, hominum dīvomque voluptās,
      alma Venus, caelī subter lābentia signa
      quae mare nāvigerum, quae terrās frūgiferentīs
      concelebrās, per tē quoniam genus omne animantum
      concipitur
      • 1916 translation by William Ellery Leonard
        Mother of Rome, delight of Gods and men,
        Dear Venus that beneath the gliding stars
        Makest to teem the many-voyaged main
        And fruitful lands - for all of living things
        Through thee alone are evermore conceived
  4. (alchemy, chemistry) copper
  5. See venus.

Declension

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Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Venus Venerēs
Genitive Veneris Venerum
Dative Venerī Veneribus
Accusative Venerem Venerēs
Ablative Venere Veneribus
Vocative Venus Venerēs

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • French: Vénus
  • Italian: Venere
  • Middle English: Venus
  • Portuguese: Vénus, Vênus (Brazil)
  • Spanish: Venus

References

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  1. ^ “Lucretius, De Rerum Natura, Liber Primus, line 1”, in Perseus Digital Library[1], 2022 October 28 (last accessed)

Middle English

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Etymology

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From Latin Venus.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus

  1. The Roman goddess governing love and sexuality; Venus.
  2. The planet closely associated with the evening: Venus.
    Synonyms: Vesper, even sterne, even sterre, eventide sterre, morwe sterre, morwetide sterre
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Descendants

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See also

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References

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Northern Sami

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Norwegian Venus.

Pronunciation

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  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈvenuːs/

Proper noun

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Venus

  1. Venus (planet)

Inflection

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Odd, no gradation
Nominative Venus
Genitive Venusa
Singular Plural
Nominative Venus Venusat
Accusative Venusa Venusiid
Genitive Venusa Venusiid
Illative Venusii Venusiidda
Locative Venusis Venusiin
Comitative Venusiin Venusiiguin
Essive Venusin
Possessive forms
Singular Dual Plural
1st person Venusan Venuseamẹ Venuseamẹt
2nd person Venusat Venuseattẹ Venuseattẹt
3rd person Venusis Venuseaskkạ Venuseasẹt

See also

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Further reading

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  • Koponen, Eino, Ruppel, Klaas, Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008), Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[5], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Norwegian

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Proper noun

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Venus

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. Venus (Roman goddess)

See also

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French Vénus, from Latin Venus.

Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. Venus (Roman goddess)
  3. A locality in Mangalia, Constanța, Romania

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈbenus/ [ˈbe.nus]
  • Rhymes: -enus
  • Syllabification: Ve‧nus

Proper noun

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Venus f

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. (Roman mythology) Venus (Roman goddess)

Derived terms

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See also

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Swedish

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Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus c (genitive Venus)

  1. Venus (planet)
  2. Venus (Roman goddess)

Anagrams

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Tagalog

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English Venus, from Latin Venus.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Venus (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒᜈᜓᜐ᜔)

  1. a female given name from English