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See also: Dove, dové, dovê, döve, døve, and dov'è

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dove, douve, duve, from Old English *dūfe (dove, pigeon), from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ (dove), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (to whisk, smoke, be obscure). Cognate with Scots doo, dow (dove), Saterland Frisian Duuwe (dove), West Frisian do (dove), Dutch duif (dove, pigeon), Low German (Low Saxon) Duuv (dove, pigeon), German Taube (dove, pigeon), Danish due (dove), Swedish duva (dove), Icelandic dúfa (dove), Gothic 𐌳𐌿𐌱𐍉 (dubo).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʌv/
  • Rhymes: -ʌv
  • (file)

NounEdit

dove (countable and uncountable, plural doves)

  1. A pigeon, especially one smaller in size; a bird (often arbitrarily called either a pigeon or a dove or both) of more than 300 species of the family Columbidae.
  2. (politics) A person favouring conciliation and negotiation rather than conflict (as opposed to hawk).
  3. Term of endearment for one regarded as pure and gentle.
    • Cant. ii. 14
      O my dove, [] let me hear thy voice.
  4. A greyish, bluish, pinkish colour like that of the bird.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A modern dialectal formation of the strong conjugation, by analogy with drivedrove and weavewove.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dove

  1. (chiefly Canada, US and English dialectal) Strong simple past tense of dive
    • 2007: Bob Harris, Who Hates Whom: Well-Armed Fanatics, Intractable Conflicts, and Various Things Blowing up: A Woefully Incomplete Guide, §: Africa, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Côte d’Ivoire, page 80, ¶ 4 (first edition; Three Rivers Press; →ISBN
      When coffee and cocoa prices unexpectedly dove, Côte d’Ivoire quickly went from Africa’s rich kid to crippling debtitude.
  2. (nonstandard) past participle of dive
Usage notesEdit
  • See dive for dived vs. dove.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dove m or f (plural doven)

  1. A deaf person.

AdjectiveEdit

dove

  1. Inflected form of doof

VerbEdit

dove

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of doven

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin doga, from Ancient Greek δοχή (dokhḗ), from Proto-Indo-European *doḱ-éh₂. Compare Italian doga, Venetian dova, doa, French douve.

NounEdit

dove f (plural dovis)

  1. stave

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ubi, or from a strengthening of the older form ove with a prothetic d-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdove/, [ˈd̪oː.ve]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dó‧ve

ConjunctionEdit

dove

  1. where
    Lo troverai dove l'hai lasciato.You'll find it where you left it.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

dove

  1. (interrogative) where, whereabouts
    Dove vai?Where are you going?
    Dove vivi?Whereabouts do you live?

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

dove

  1. Alternative form of douve

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dove

  1. neuter singular of doven