Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French confit, p.p. of confire(to preserve), from Latin cōnficere (perfect passive participle cōnfectus).

NounEdit

confit ‎(plural confits)

  1. Any of various kinds of food that have been immersed in a substance for both flavor and preservation.

VerbEdit

confit ‎(third-person singular simple present confits, present participle confiting, simple past and past participle confited)

  1. (transitive) To prepare (food) in this manner.
    • 2008 June 18, Melissa Clark, “A Garlic Festival Without a Single Clove”, in New York Times[1]:
      I came up with a menu to showcase the alliums in several manifestations: raw, quickly sautéed and slowly confited.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French [Term?], from Latin cōnfectus.

AdjectiveEdit

confit m ‎(feminine singular confite, masculine plural confits, feminine plural confites)

  1. (food) preserved, pickled

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

confit f ‎(plural confits)

  1. confit

VerbEdit

confit

  1. past participle of confire
  2. third-person singular present indicative of confire
  3. third-person singular past historic of confire

LatinEdit