Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French confit, p.p. of confire (to preserve), from Latin cōnficere (perfect passive participle cōnfectus).

NounEdit

confit (plural confits)

  1. Any of various kinds of food that have been immersed in a substance for both flavor and preservation.

VerbEdit

confit (third-person singular simple present confits, present participle confiting, simple past and past participle confited)

  1. (transitive) To prepare (food) in this manner.
    • 2008 June 18, Melissa Clark, “A Garlic Festival Without a Single Clove”, in New York Times[1]:
      I came up with a menu to showcase the alliums in several manifestations: raw, quickly sautéed and slowly confited.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French [Term?], from Latin cōnfectus.

AdjectiveEdit

confit m (feminine singular confite, masculine plural confits, feminine plural confites)

  1. (food) preserved, pickled

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

confit f (plural confits)

  1. confit

VerbEdit

confit

  1. past participle of confire
  2. third-person singular present indicative of confire
  3. third-person singular past historic of confire

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

cōnfīt

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of cōnfiō

ReferencesEdit