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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contemptuous +‎ -ly.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈtɛmp.tʃu.əs.li/, /kənˈtɛmp.tju.əs.li/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kənˈtɛmp.tʃu.əs.li/

AdverbEdit

contemptuously (comparative more contemptuously, superlative most contemptuously)

  1. In a disrespectful or discourteous manner; condescendingly.
    He argued with the judge contemptuously, showing no respect or remorse for his actions.
    • 1867, Charles Dickens, chapter 4, in Oliver Twist:
      'They haven't no more philosophy nor political economy about 'em than that,' said the beadle, snapping his fingers contemptuously.
    • 1986, Treatise on Constitutional Law: Substance and Procedure, Volume 3‎, page 36
      Under the statute an individual who "publicly mutilates, tramples upon, defaces or treats contemptuously the flag of the United States [] " was subject to criminal liability.
    • 1994, Joseph Veramo, Moving through the Streets: A Novel‎, page 39:
      The girl looked at Onisi contemptuously, then laughed jeeringly. He was then six years old and didn't know how to speak in English so he couldn't understand what she was saying but he sensed that it was derogatory.

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