contio

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of conventiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cōntiō f ‎(genitive cōntiōnis); third declension

  1. a meeting, assembly
  2. a speech, oration or discourse before a public assembly

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cōntiō cōntiōnēs
genitive cōntiōnis cōntiōnum
dative cōntiōnī cōntiōnibus
accusative cōntiōnem cōntiōnēs
ablative cōntiōne cōntiōnibus
vocative cōntiō cōntiōnēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • contio” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • contio” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to address a meeting of the people: verba facere apud populum, in contione
    • to mount the rostra: in contionem (in rostra) escendere (only of Romans)
    • to summon an assembly of the people: contionem advocare (Sall. Iug. 33. 3)
    • to harangue the soldiers: contionem habere apud milites
  • contio” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
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