convenientia

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

convenientia (uncountable)

  1. agreement
  2. symmetry

QuotationsEdit

  • 1997: Chris Horrocks, Introducing Foucault, page 67, The Renaissance Episteme (Totem Books, Icon Books; →ISBN
    Words and things were united in their resemblance. Renaissance man thought in terms of similitudes: the theatre of life, the mirror of nature. […]
    'Convenientia' connected things near to one another, e.g. animal and plant, making a great “chain” of being.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From conveniēns, present active participle of conveniō (convene).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

convenientia f (genitive convenientiae); first declension

  1. accord, harmony, symmetry, agreement, conformity

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative convenientia convenientiae
Genitive convenientiae convenientiārum
Dative convenientiae convenientiīs
Accusative convenientiam convenientiās
Ablative convenientiā convenientiīs
Vocative convenientia convenientiae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ParticipleEdit

convenientia

  1. nominative neuter plural of conveniēns
  2. accusative neuter plural of conveniēns
  3. vocative neuter plural of conveniēns

ReferencesEdit