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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ōrō (to speak as an orator; plead; pray) +‎ -tiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōrātiō f (genitive ōrātiōnis); third declension

  1. speech, discourse, language
  2. the power of speech
  3. manner or style of speaking
  4. oration
  5. eloquence
  6. sentence or clause expressing a complete sense
  7. imperial message
  8. prayer or address to a deity

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ōrātiō ōrātiōnēs
Genitive ōrātiōnis ōrātiōnum
Dative ōrātiōnī ōrātiōnibus
Accusative ōrātiōnem ōrātiōnēs
Ablative ōrātiōne ōrātiōnibus
Vocative ōrātiō ōrātiōnēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • oratio in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • oratio in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • oratio in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • oratio in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • his words find an easy hearing, are listened to with pleasure: oratio in aures influit
    • a funeral oration: oratio funebris
    • to compose a speech: orationem conficere
    • to prepare, get up a speech: orationem commentari (Fam. 16. 26)
    • a prepared speech: oratio meditata (Plin. 26. 3. 7)
    • an extempore speech: oratio subita
    • a continuous discourse: oratio perpetua
    • a carefully prepared speech: oratio accurata et polita
    • an elaborate speech: oratio composita
    • to make a speech: orationem habere (Tusc. 5. 33. 94)
    • to obtain a hearing: audientiam sibi (orationi) facere
    • style: genus dicendi (scribendi); oratio
    • a running style: fusum orationis genus
    • a bombastic style: inflatum orationis genus
    • a bombastic style: oratio altius exaggerata
    • the exalted strain of the speech: elatio atque altitudo orationis
    • an easy, fluent style: expedita et facile currens oratio
    • an easy, fluent style: oratio aequabiliter fluens
    • flow of oratory: flumen orationis (De Or. 2. 15. 62)
    • the plain style: siccitas, sanitas orationis
    • the plain style: verborum tenuitias, oratio subtilis
    • the dry, lifeless style: oratio exilis, ieiuna, arida, exsanguis
    • well-chosen language, grace of style: ornatus orationis, verborum
    • tasteful description: elegantia orationis
    • pure, correct language: oratio pura, pura et emendata
    • purity of style: integritas, sinceritas orationis (not puritas)
    • incorrect language: oratio inquinata (De Opt. Gen. Or. 3. 7)
    • Cato's speeches sound archaic: orationes Catonis antiquitatem redolent (Brut. 21. 82)
    • there is a flavour of Atticism about his discourse: ex illius orationibus ipsae Athenae redolent
    • prose: oratio soluta (not prosa) or simply oratio
    • his style has a well-balanced cadence: oratio numerose cadit
    • to make a speech rhythmical: numeris orationem astringere, vincire
    • a full and copious style of speech: ubertas (not divitiae) et copia orationis
    • to express clearly, make a lifelike representation of a thing: exprimere aliquid verbis or oratione (vid. sect. VI. 3, note adumbrare...)
    • the connection: contextus orationis (not nexus, conexus sententiarum)
    • the circumstances are described in language worthy of them: rebus ipsis par est oratio
    • to interpolate, insert something: includere in orationem aliquid
    • to interpolate, insert something: inserere orationi aliquid
    • a rather recondite speech: oratio longius repetita (De Or. 3. 24. 91)
    • to express oneself in popular language: ad vulgarem sensum or ad communem opinionem orationem accommodare (Off. 2. 10. 35)
    • to read a speech: de scripto orationem habere, dicere (opp. sine scripto, ex memoria)
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed redeat, unde aberravit oratio
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: verum ut ad id, unde digressa est oratio, revertamur
    • to intersperse one's speech with humorous remarks: aspergere sales orationi (Or. 26. 87)
    • a mistake, solecism: vitium orationis, sermonis or simply vitium
    • to be unable to express one's ideas: orationis expertem esse
    • the period: ambitus, circuitus, comprehensio, continuatio (verborum, orationis), also simply periodus
    • the book, speech can easily be obtained: liber, oratio in manibus est
    • the text of the author (not textus): verba, oratio, exemplum scriptoris
    • I avoid mentioning...; I prefer not to touch upon..: supersedeo oratione (not dicere)
  • oratio in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016