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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French coquelicot (red poppy).

NounEdit

coquelicot (countable and uncountable, plural coquelicots)

  1. A reddish-orange colour; poppy
    • 1980, Stephen Donaldson, The Wounded Land: The Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant Book One, Hachette UK →ISBN
      It appeared baleful, fiery and red; it wore coquelicot like a crown of thorns, and cast a humid heat entirely unlike the fierce intensity of the desert sun.
    • 2011, Cynthia Harrod-Eagles, The Flood-Tide: The Morland Dynasty, Hachette UK →ISBN
      'All these weeks we have wasted wrangling, and I knew from the beginning that it must be the green, and not the coquelicot.'
    coquelicot colour:  

AdjectiveEdit

coquelicot (comparative more coquelicot, superlative most coquelicot)

  1. Having a reddish-orange poppy colour.
    • 1798, Jane Austen, The Letters (Annotated Edition), Jazzybee Verlag →ISBN
      I still venture to retain the narrow silver round it, put twice round without any bow, and instead of the black military feather shall put in the coquelicot one as being smarter, and besides coquelicot is to be all the fashion this winter.

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

Variant of cocorico (cock's cry), from a similarity to a rooster's crest.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.kli.ko/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -o

NounEdit

coquelicot m (plural coquelicots)

  1. poppy, corn poppy, red poppy (Papaver rhoeas)

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

coquelicot m (plural coquelicots)

  1. (Guernsey) poppy

SynonymsEdit