countre

See also: countre-

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See counter

VerbEdit

countre (third-person singular simple present countres, present participle countring, simple past and past participle countred)

  1. Obsolete form of counter.

Etymology 2Edit

See country

NounEdit

countre (plural countres)

  1. (Early Modern English) Country.
    • c. 1549, Desiderius Erasmus, Two Dyaloges[1]:
      But what say ye by hym whiche when he oweth more then he is worthe, wyll not stycke to lashe prodygallye and set the cocke vpon the hoope, and yet yf he haue any money at all lefte to spende that a waye vnthryftely, and when he hathe played the parte of a knauyshe spendall in one cytie deludinge and disceyuyng his creditours, ronnes out of this countre and getteth hym to some other good towne, and there sekynge for straugers and newe acquayntauce whom he may lykewyse begyle, yea and playeth many suche lyke partes and shameful shiftes.

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

AdverbEdit

countre

  1. (late Anglo-Norman) Alternative spelling of cuntre

PrepositionEdit

countre

  1. (late Anglo-Norman) Alternative spelling of cuntre