English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English contre, contree, contreie, from Old French contree, from Vulgar Latin (terra) contrāta ((land) lying opposite; (land) spread before), derived from Latin contra (against, opposite). Cognate with Scots kintra.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

country (plural countries)

  1. The territory of a nation, especially an independent nation state or formerly independent nation; a political entity asserting ultimate authority over a geographical area; a sovereign state. [from 14th c.]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:country
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 5, in Death on the Centre Court:
      By one o'clock the place was choc-a-bloc. [] The restaurant was packed, and the promenade between the two main courts and the subsidiary courts was thronged with healthy-looking youngish people, drawn to the Mecca of tennis from all parts of the country.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus, published 2010, page 3:
      It is a beautiful country of rolling hills, fertile valleys, and a thousand rivers and streams which keep the landscape green even in winter.
    • 2010, The Economist, 3 Feb 2011:
      These days corporate Germany looks rather different. Volkswagen, the country’s leading carmaker, wants to be the world’s biggest by 2018.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68:
      The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them, which is then licensed to related businesses in high-tax countries, is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies.
  2. A set region of land having particular human occupation or agreed limits, especially inhabited by members of the same race, speakers of the same language etc., or associated with a given person, occupation, species etc. [from 13th c.]
    • 2007 February 17, Chris Moss, The Guardian:
      This is condor country – the only region this far east where you can see the magnificent vulture – and a small national park straddling the passes, El Condorito, is a good stopover for walkers and birders.
  3. (uncountable, usually preceded by “the”) A rural area, as opposed to a town or city; the countryside. [from 16th c.]
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 17, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], →OCLC:
      I was borne and brought up in the Countrie, and amidst husbandry [].
    • 2000 March 4, Alexander Chancellor, The Guardian:
      I have always thought that one of the main reasons for the popularity of blood sports in the country is the pointlessness of going outdoors with no purpose or destination in mind.
    • 2006 May, James B. Weld, Difficulties in Learning English as a Second or Foreign Language[1], Regis University, page 37:
      She grew up in Chang-hua, a city in central Taiwan with a decidedly country flavor.
  4. (chiefly Britain) An area of land; a district, region. [from 13th c.]
    • 2010 March 7, David Vann, The Observer:
      We walk along flat, open country, red dirt and spinifex grass, a few short trees [].
  5. (Australia, usually capitalised) Traditional lands of Indigenous people with embedded cultural, spiritual, cosmological, ecological, and physical attributes and values.
    • 1842 February 16, The Inquirer, Perth, page 5, column 2:
      "Me like my country — no much too hot, no much too cold. By and bye, white fellow come — soldier-man come. White fellow say, this our land, that our land — ALL country our land. Black fellow say no! my country no white fellow's country, and black fellow take spear.
    • 1945 September 27, The Chronicle, Adelaide, page 35, column 4:
      "Yewi," he said, "me bin longa Fanny Bay gaol five years." On my asking why they put him in gaol he replied. "Australia your country, ain't it?" I replied, "Yes, him my country all right." "Well," he then said, "this my country here. Brinken country other side of the river ain't it?" "That's right," said I. "Well," said Jack, "supposem Japanese come longa this country and you killem, you good man, but suppose Brinken come longa my country here, and I kill him, police man put me longa Fanny Bay for five years. That is the law."
    • 2008 July 23, The Torres News, page 5, column 1:
      "It demonstrates that having Indigenous people on country managing their lands, delivering environmental benefits for all Australians is an important asset for the national good."
    • 2015 March 11, Calla Wahlquist, “Of three remote communities here, why are only the two Aboriginal ones under threat?”, in The Guardian[2], London: Guardian News & Media, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2022-10-07:
      Milgin says living on country, with elders, makes Aboriginal people "strong". That's backed up by a 2011 report on Aboriginal homelands by Amnesty International that found that living on homelands was connected to better health outcomes and drug rehabilitation.
    • 2021 July 8, The Air Force News, page 16, column 2:
      What country do you live/work on? I work on Yuggera Yuggarapul country and I'm from Darwin, Larrakia country.
  6. Ellipsis of country music. [from 20th c.]
    a country song
    a country singer
    a country festival
  7. (mining) The rock through which a vein runs.

Usage notes edit

The geographical sense of "country" usually refers to a sovereign state, that is, a nation with no administrative dependence on another one, which is the definition adopted in most world maps. In a broader sense, however, "country" may also refer to polities with some degree of autonomy and cultural identity but still under the sovereignty of another state. Examples of the latter include Scotland, Tibet, Abkhazia, and Greenland. Such usage may be interpreted as supporting secessionism of these polities by others.

Hyponyms edit

See also Thesaurus:country.

Hyponyms of country (noun)

Derived terms edit

Terms derived from country (noun)

Descendants edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Adjective edit

country (not comparable)

  1. From or in the countryside or connected with it.
  2. Of or connected to country music.
  3. (India, historical) Originating in India rather than being imported from Europe or elsewhere.
    • 1872, Silk in India, page 16:
      We have seen that the Company manufactured silk stuffs at three of its Residencies, but from country-wound silk.
    • 1884, Journal of the United Service Institution of India, page 185:
      A reference to the Annual Administration Reports of the Department of Horse-breeding Operations [] will allow of the opinion being arrived at, that the breed of country horses under the present regime is steadily improving.
    • 1937, Brigadier-General H. A. Young, The East India Company’s Arsenals & Manufactories:
      Country harness costs nearly as much, lasts half the time, and is in every respect inferior. It is understood that the only reason is that the Court desires to improve and encourage Indian manufactures.

Translations edit

References edit

  • country”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.
  • country in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • "country" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 81.
  • country”, in The Century Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911, →OCLC.

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

country inan

  1. country music

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • "country" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus

Finnish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English country.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɑntri/, [ˈkɑ̝n̪t̪ri]

Noun edit

country

  1. country music

Declension edit

Inflection of country (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative country
genitive countryn
partitive countrya
illative countryyn
singular plural
nominative country
accusative nom. country
gen. countryn
genitive countryn
partitive countrya
inessive countryssa
elative countrysta
illative countryyn
adessive countrylla
ablative countrylta
allative countrylle
essive countryna
translative countryksi
abessive countrytta
instructive
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of country (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative countryni
accusative nom. countryni
gen. countryni
genitive countryni
partitive countryani
inessive countryssani
elative countrystani
illative countryyni
adessive countryllani
ablative countryltani
allative countrylleni
essive countrynani
translative countrykseni
abessive countryttani
instructive
comitative
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative countrysi
accusative nom. countrysi
gen. countrysi
genitive countrysi
partitive countryasi
inessive countryssasi
elative countrystasi
illative countryysi
adessive countryllasi
ablative countryltasi
allative countryllesi
essive countrynasi
translative countryksesi
abessive countryttasi
instructive
comitative
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative countrymme
accusative nom. countrymme
gen. countrymme
genitive countrymme
partitive countryamme
inessive countryssamme
elative countrystamme
illative countryymme
adessive countryllamme
ablative countryltamme
allative countryllemme
essive countrynamme
translative countryksemme
abessive countryttamme
instructive
comitative
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative countrynne
accusative nom. countrynne
gen. countrynne
genitive countrynne
partitive countryanne
inessive countryssanne
elative countrystanne
illative countryynne
adessive countryllanne
ablative countryltanne
allative countryllenne
essive countrynanne
translative countryksenne
abessive countryttanne
instructive
comitative
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative countrynsa
accusative nom. countrynsa
gen. countrynsa
genitive countrynsa
partitive countryaan
countryansa
inessive countryssaan
countryssansa
elative countrystaan
countrystansa
illative countryynsa
adessive countryllaan
countryllansa
ablative countryltaan
countryltansa
allative countrylleen
countryllensa
essive countrynaan
countrynansa
translative countrykseen
countryksensa
abessive countryttaan
countryttansa
instructive
comitative

Synonyms edit

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

From English. Doublet of contrée.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

country m (uncountable)

  1. country music

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English country.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

country m (invariable)

  1. (music) country music

References edit

  1. ^ country in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Pseudo-anglicism, derived from country music.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkan.trɨ/
  • Rhymes: -antrɨ
  • Syllabification: coun‧try

Noun edit

country n (indeclinable)

  1. country, country music

Derived terms edit

adjectives

Further reading edit

  • country in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • country in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English country.

The pronunciation reflects the incorrect belief that the <oun> represents /aʊn/ in the English etymon.

Pronunciation edit

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɐ̃w̃.tɾi/ [ˈkɐ̃ʊ̯̃.tɾi], /ˈkaw̃.tɾi/ [ˈkaʊ̯̃.tɾi]

Noun edit

country m (uncountable)

  1. country music

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English country.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

country m or n (feminine singular countryă, masculine plural countryi, feminine and neuter plural countrye)

  1. country (music)

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English country. Doublet of contrada.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

country m (uncountable)

  1. country music

Usage notes edit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English country. First attested in 1965.

Noun edit

country c (uncountable)

  1. (music) country, country music
    Synonym: countrymusik
    • 1986, Claes Eriksson (lyrics and music), “Truckdriving song”, in Macken [The gas station], performed by Per Fritzell:
      Howdy, cowboy! Visa nu, vad har du på din mack? Jag behöver fylla skafferiet på min truck [English]. Tuggummi, så klart, snus och chips, en låda dryck, skulle jag bli glad om jag fick. Jag drar min långtradarsång, min lastbilskörarsång, för jag har sån smak för bilar med flak. Jag drar min truckdriving song [English], tjugofyra meter lång, och jag tackar Gud för countryns alla ljud. Och om låten blir för tråkig, ja, då jag tar jag det kallt. Ja, då byter jag tonart och höjer ett halvt. Ja, jag höjer ett halvt.
      Howdy, cowboy! Show me now, what do you have at your gas station? I need to fill the pantry in my truck [English]. Chewing gum, of course, snus and chips [in the US sense], a case of drink, I would be happy if I got. I do [pull] my big rig song, my truck driving song, because I have such taste for cars with a flatbed [platform]. I do my truckdriving song [English], twenty-four meters long, and I thank God for all the sounds of country music ("for the country music's all sounds"). And if the song gets too boring, yes, then I stay cool [take it cool]. Yes, then I change the key and raise by a half [step]. Yes, I raise by a half [step].

Declension edit

Declension of country 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative country countryn
Genitive countrys countryns

Further reading edit