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EnglishEdit

 
A daddy longlegs (cranefly)
 
A daddy longlegs (harvestman)
 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From daddy + longlegs.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdædɪ ˈlɒŋ(ɡ)leɡz/

NounEdit

daddy longlegs (plural daddy longlegs or daddy longlegses)

  1. (Britain, Ireland) The cranefly; any insect of the suborder Tipulomorpha.
    • 2004, Bill Hansford-Steele, African Fly-fishing Handbook[1], page 316:
      Daddy longlegs adults are weak flyers, falling onto the water surface in the lightest of breezes, and even on calm days.
  2. (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, US) Any (non-spider) arachnid of the order Opiliones, mostly with long thin legs; the harvestman.
    • 2002, Maurice Burton, Robert Burton, The International Wildlife Encyclopedia, Volume 10, page 636,
      Unlike spiders, daddy longlegs do not have a clearly marked division between thorax and abdomen. They are further distinguished from spiders in that they do not produce venom or silk.
    • 2004, Clay Thompson, Marshall Trimble, The Valley 101 Great Big Book of Life, page 33,
      Daddy longlegs aren′t even really spiders.
  3. (loosely) The daddy long-legs spider, any spider of the family Pholcidae.
    • 2010, Lou Bensinger, Tiny Invaders in Your Home[2], page 10:
      Another spider neighbor that is commonly found in homes is the daddy longlegs. The daddy longlegs is often called a cellar spider.

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Some confusion exists because of the use of (almost) the same term for an insect, a non-spider arachnid and a spider. This is partly alleviated by some authors by reserving the term daddy long-legs spider for the spider alone.

TranslationsEdit