See also: Thìn, þin, þín, thiⁿ, and thîn

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English thinne, thünne, thenne, from Old English þynne, from Proto-West Germanic *þunnī, from Proto-Germanic *þunnuz (thin) – compare *þanjaną (to stretch, spread out) – from Proto-Indo-European *ténh₂us (thin), from *ten- (to stretch).

Cognate with German dünn, Dutch dun, West Frisian tin, Icelandic þunnur, Danish tynd, Swedish tunn, Latin tenuis, Irish tanaí, Welsh tenau, Latvian tievs, Sanskrit तनु (tanú, thin), Persian تنگ(tang, narrow). Doublet of tenuis. Also related to tenuous.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

thin (comparative thinner, superlative thinnest)

  1. Having little thickness or extent from one surface to its opposite.
    thin plate of metal;  thin paper;  thin board;  thin covering
  2. Very narrow in all diameters; having a cross section that is small in all directions.
    thin wire;  thin string
  3. Having little body fat or flesh; slim; slender; lean; gaunt.
    thin person
  4. Of low viscosity or low specific gravity.
    Water is thinner than honey.
  5. Scarce; not close, crowded, or numerous; not filling the space.
    The trees of a forest are thin; the corn or grass is thin.
  6. (golf) Describing a poorly played golf shot where the ball is struck by the bottom part of the club head. See fat, shank, toe.
  7. Lacking body or volume; small; feeble; not full.
    • 1690, [John] Dryden, Don Sebastian, King of Portugal: [], London: [] Jo. Hindmarsh, [], OCLC 1154883115, (please specify the page number):
      thin, hollow sounds, and lamentable screams
  8. Slight; small; slender; flimsy; superficial; inadequate; not sufficient for a covering.
    a thin disguise
  9. (aviation) Of a route: relatively little used.
    • 2016, Hartmut Wolf, ‎Peter Forsyth, ‎David Gillen, Liberalization in Aviation (page 105)
      In short, we previously found that thin routes benefit from an increase in competition in the Spanish airline market when considering routes that were monopoly routes in 2001.
  10. Poor; scanty; without money or success.
    • 1945, Jack Henry, What Price Crime? (page 92)
      Like their friends the "draggers," the "hoisters" or shoplifters are having a thin time these days, []

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

thin (plural thins)

  1. (philately) A loss or tearing of paper from the back of a stamp, although not sufficient to create a complete hole.
  2. Any food produced or served in thin slices.
    chocolate mint thins
    potato thins

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

thin (third-person singular simple present thins, present participle thinning, simple past and past participle thinned)

  1. (transitive) To make thin or thinner.
  2. (intransitive) To become thin or thinner.
    The crowds thinned after the procession had passed: there was nothing more to see.
  3. To dilute.
  4. To remove some plants or parts of plants in order to improve the growth of what remains.
    • 2015 September 5, Mark Diacono, “In praise of the Asian pear”, in The Daily Telegraph (Gardening)[1], archived from the original on 12 September 2015, page 3:
      So floriferous are Asian pears, and the tree so laden with young fruit, that as the tree approaches maturity it is worth considering thinning the fruit (I can't quite bring myself to thin the flowers) so as to neither overburden the tree for this year nor tire it for the next. Thinning early in the season, while the fruit is small, is ideal.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

thin (comparative more thin, superlative most thin)

  1. Not thickly or closely; in a scattered state.
    seed sown thin
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      Spain is a nation thin sown of people.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

DeterminerEdit

thin (subjective pronoun þou)

  1. Alternative form of þin (thy)

PronounEdit

thin (subjective þou)

  1. Alternative form of þin (thine)

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

thin

  1. Alternative form of thinne (thin)

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *þīn.

DeterminerEdit

thīn

  1. thy, your (singular)
  2. thine, yours

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: dijn
    • Dutch: dijn
    • Limburgish: dien

Further readingEdit

  • thīn”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

thīn

  1. Alternative form of din

ReferencesEdit

  1. Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer, Second Edition

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *þīn.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

thīn

  1. thy, your (singular)
  2. thine, yours
DeclensionEdit


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Altsächsisches Wörterbuch, (5. Auflage) 2014
  2. Altsächsisches Elementarbuch by Dr. F. Holthausen

Etymology 2Edit

See here.

DeterminerEdit

thin

  1. instrumental singular masculine/neuter of thē

WelshEdit

NounEdit

thin

  1. Aspirate mutation of tin.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tin din nhin thin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.