demijohn

EnglishEdit

 
An illustration of a demijohn
 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French dame-jeanne (literally Lady Jane), of uncertain origin. Note that the French Jeanne (Jane, feminine of John) has changed to the masculine form John, rather than the cognate English Jane.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

demijohn (plural demijohns)

  1. A large bottle with a short neck, sometimes with two small handles at the neck, sometimes encased in wickerwork.
    • 1920, Peter B. Kyne, chapter VIII, in The Understanding Heart:
      “Reckon it's first-drink time,” the old prospector cried cheerily, and unearthed Monica's two-gallon demijohn.
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber 1992, p. 234:
      Toby, placing his gold-rimmed spectacles on his nose, set our dinner to simmer and uncorked a demijohn of the old Verfeuille red which glowed in our glasses with the embers of old recollections of half-forgotten journeys and excursions of our youth by the light of the moon.

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