See also: jane, janë, and Janė

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Variant of Jeanne, from French Jeanne, from Middle French Jehanne, from Medieval Latin Johanna, variant of Latin Ioanna under influence from Latin Iōhannēs, from Koine Greek Ἰωάννα (Iōánna), from Hebrew יוֹחָנָה(Yôḥānāh, literally God is gracious), the feminized form of יְהוֹחָנָן(Yəhōḥānān) which produced John and its many doublets. As a placeholder name, cf. similar use of John and Jack and earlier use of Joan in the same role.

Doublet of Ivana, Jana, Janice, Janis, Jean, Jeanne, Jen, Joan, Joanna, Joanne, Johanna, Juana, Shavonne, Sian, Siobhan, Shane, Shaun, Shauna, and Sheena.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Jane (plural Janes)

  1. A female given name from French, the standard feminine form of John since the 17th century.
    • 1605 William Camden: Remains Concerning Britain. John Russell Smith, 1870. p.103-104:
      In latter years some of the better and nicer sort, misliking Joan, have mollified the name of Joan into Jane, as it may seem, for that Jane is never found in old Records; and as some will, never before the time of King Henry the eight.
    • 1830 Mary Russell Mitford, Our Village: Fourth Series: Cottage Names:
      People will please their fancies, and every lady has favourite names. I myself have several, and they are mostly short and simple. Jane, that queenly name! Jane Seymour, Jane Grey, 'the noble Jane de Montford;' - - -
    • 1912 Saki (H.H.Munro), The Secret Sin of Septimus Brope:
      "What I mean is," said Mrs. Riversedge, "that when I get maids with unsuitable names I call them Jane; they soon get used to it."
      "An excellent plan," said the aunt of Clovis coldly; "unfortunately I have got used to being called Jane myself. It happens to be my name."
  2. A surname originating as a patronymic derived from a Middle English variant of John.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Jane (plural Janes)

  1. (colloquial) used as a placeholder name for any woman, especially a young working-class woman
  2. (slang) A girlfriend.
    What happened to your regular Jane?
  3. Alternative letter-case form of jane (female client of a prostitute)

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English Jane, from French Jeanne, from Old French Jehane, from Medieval Latin Johanna; from Latin Iōhannēs (variant of Iōannēs), from New Testament Greek Ἰωάννης (Iōánnēs), from Biblical Hebrew יוֹחָנָן(Yōḥānān), perhaps contracted from a former יְהוֹחָנָן(Yəhōḥānān, God is gracious).

Proper nounEdit

Jane

  1. a female given name from Hebrew

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Jane

  1. vocative singular of Jan

Alternative formsEdit


DanishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Jane

  1. a female given name, a Danish diminutive of Christiane, Juliane and Mariane, today also associated with the English Jane

EstonianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Jane

  1. a female given name, variant of Janne

NorwegianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Jane

  1. a female given name derived from Johanne, or borrowed from English

SwedishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Jane c (genitive Janes)

  1. a female given name borrowed from English, less often from Danish or Norwegian