deviator

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From deviate +‎ -or.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deviator (plural deviators)

  1. That which deviates, or causes deviation
    • 2007 April 29, Jon Meacham, “Friends of Winston”, in New York Times[1]:
      For Tories like Cartland, deviating from the Chamberlain line was seen as betrayal, not disagreement, and the deviators were subjected to raw schoolboy pressure.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

(Classical) IPA(key): /deː.u̯iˈaː.tor/, [d̪eːu̯iˈäːt̪ɔr]

VerbEdit

dēviātor

  1. second/third-person singular future passive imperative of dēviō

ReferencesEdit

  • deviator in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • deviator in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French déviateur

NounEdit

deviator m (plural deviatori)

  1. diverter

DeclensionEdit