EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin -tor.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. Creates an agent noun, indicating a person who does something.
    survive + ‎-or → ‎survivor
    Synonyms: -er, (casual) -ster
    Hyponyms: -a, -ess, -ette, -rix
    Coordinate term: (converse form; one who receives from the actor) -ee
  2. (electrical science) Appended to the names of members of classes of components, especially those that have an extensive property name of the same root suffixed with -ance
    Resistors possess resistance and inductors possess inductance.
Usage notesEdit

In Latin-derived words, English generally appends this suffix where Latin would do it—to the root of a perfect passive participle (i.e. past participle). For other words, English tends to use the suffix -er. Occasionally both are used (protester vs. protestor).

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
  • -er (alternative spelling)
  • -rix (feminine form)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin -or.

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. Used to form nouns of quality, state, or condition.
    err + ‎-or → ‎error

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

SuffixEdit

-or m (feminine singular -ore, masculine plural -orë, feminine plural -ore)

  1. A suffix that forms adjectives which do not require adjectival articles

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin -or, -ōris.

SuffixEdit

-or f (plural -ors)

  1. Used to create abstract nouns from adjectives; -ness
    blanc (white) + ‎-or → ‎blancor (whiteness)
    buit (empty) + ‎-or → ‎buidor (emptiness)

Further readingEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Modeled after -ar and -os.

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. Used to denote the future infinitive of a verb.
    Tu mustas kompror lakto kande tu es che la butiko.
    You must buy milk when you are at the shop.

Related termsEdit

  • -ar (present infinitive tense)
  • -ir (past infinitive tense)

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *-ōs, from Proto-Indo-European *-ōs, for original *-oss, i.e. the neuter s-stem *-os with masculine nominative *-s. The ō from the nominative case was made common to all cases originally with non-ablauting o (the three exceptions were arbor, mulier and Cerēs). Afterwards nom.sg. -ōr > -or, by Latin sound laws. Thus paradoxically, as in the r-stems (soror, -tor), in the resulting paradigm the one form with a short stem vowel is the only form whose stem was etymologically long.[1]

SuffixEdit

-or m (genitive -ōris); third declension

  1. used to form a third-declension masculine abstract noun from a verb root or conceived root form
    amō (I love) + ‎-or → ‎amor (love)
    timeō (I fear”, “I am afraid) + ‎-or → ‎timor (fear)
    Synonyms: -ēs, -us
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative -or -ōrēs
Genitive -ōris -ōrum
Dative -ōrī -ōribus
Accusative -ōrem -ōrēs
Ablative -ōre -ōribus
Vocative -or -ōrēs
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN

NorwegianEdit

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. A plural marker, used on feminine gender nouns ending with an unstressed -e [-a].

Usage notesEdit

The -or suffix is a bracket form in Nynorsk whereas -er is the main form. In Bokmål, -er is the only form allowed suffix.


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ar-. Akin to Old High German -ar.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. suffix forming adjectives from verbs denoting tendency or causation
    slīpan (to slip, glide) + ‎-or → ‎slipor (slippery)
    wacian (to be awake, be watchful) + ‎-or → ‎wacor (vigilant, watchful)
DescendantsEdit
  • English: -er

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-áz. Akin to Old Saxon -or, Old High German -ur.

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. Suffix variant found on masculine a-stem nouns
    ċeole (throat) + ‎-or → ‎ċeolor (collar, throat)
    eald (old) + ‎-or → ‎ealdor (chieftain, ruler)
    siġe (victory) + ‎-or → ‎sigor (victory)
    telga (branch, bough) + ‎-or → ‎telgor (branch, twig)
    dæġ (day) + ‎-or → ‎dōgor (day)
    sele (hall) + ‎-or → ‎salor (hall, palace)
DeclensionEdit

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin -(a)tor.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-or (nominative singular -ere, occasionally -ors)

  1. -er, suffix used to form agent nouns

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin -or.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-or (nominative singular -or)

  1. -ness, indicates a quality, a characteristic
    blanche + ‎-or → ‎blanchor (whiteness)
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle French: -eur (both etymologies)
    • French: -eur (both etymologies)
  • Norman: -eux
  • Middle English: -our (in part)
Derived termsEdit

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-or m inan

  1. forms augmentatives
    język + ‎-or → ‎jęzor

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

SuffixEdit

-or (Cyrillic spelling -ор)

  1. Suffix appended to words to create a masculine noun, usually denoting a profession or a performer, used chiefly for words of Latin origin.

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

SuffixEdit

-or m

  1. Used to create abstract nouns from adjectives
    dulce + ‎-or → ‎dulzor

SuffixEdit

-or m (feminine -ora)

  1. Used to create agent nouns from verbs
    revisar + ‎-or → ‎revisor

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-or

  1. A plural marker. This marker is the regular plural for common gender nouns ending with an unstressed -a. Such an -a disappears when -or is added. The marker is used, however, with a few other nouns as well.
    docka (doll) + ‎-or → ‎dockor (dolls)
    våg (wave) + ‎-or → ‎vågor (waves)

AnagramsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cf. Latin -ārius.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-or m (plural -orion)

  1. person or man associated with root
    telyn (harp) + ‎-or → ‎telynor ((male) harpist)
    llên (literature) + ‎-or → ‎llenor (literary man, man o letters)
    carchar (prison) + ‎-or → ‎carcharor (prisoner)
    Synonyms: -wr, -ydd

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “-or”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies