diabolus

See also: Diabolus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diabolus. Doublet of devil, diable, and diablo.

NounEdit

diabolus (plural diaboluses)

  1. (music) Synonym of tritone

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Ancient Greek διάβολος (diábolos, slanderer).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /diˈa.bu.lus/, [d̪iˈäbʊɫ̪ʊs̠]
  • (file)
  • (Late Latin) IPA(key): /ˈza.bu.lus/, [ˈd̪͡z̪äβʊɫ̪ʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /diˈa.bo.lus/, [d̪iˈɑːbɔlus]
  • (file)
  • Note: the three root vowels are phonemically short, but all are found lengthened in verse in order to fit the metre.[1]

NounEdit

diabolus m (genitive diabolī); second declension

  1. devil

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative diabolus diabolī
Genitive diabolī diabolōrum
Dative diabolō diabolīs
Accusative diabolum diabolōs
Ablative diabolō diabolīs
Vocative diabole diabolī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Note: all are early borrowings from Medieval Church Latin. Some Slavic descendants here have been borrowed directly from Ancient Greek διάβολος (diábolos).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Peter Christian Jacobsen and Peter Orth (2020-06-14) , “Materialien zu einem Lexikon der irregulären lateinischen Prosodie”, in www.mgh.de[1]

Further readingEdit