See also: dictatură

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dictātor ‎(chief magistrate), from dictō ‎(dictate, prescribe), from dīcō ‎(say, speak).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dictātūra f ‎(genitive dictātūrae); first declension

  1. dictatorship, office of a dictator

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative dictātūra dictātūrae
genitive dictātūrae dictātūrārum
dative dictātūrae dictātūrīs
accusative dictātūram dictātūrās
ablative dictātūrā dictātūrīs
vocative dictātūra dictātūrae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • dictatura in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dictatura in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dictatura in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • there are whispers of the appointment of a dictator: non nullus odor est dictaturae (Att. 4. 18)
    • to be dictator: dictaturam gerere
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