dictum

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin dictum (proverb, maxim).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dictum (plural dicta or dictums)

  1. An authoritative statement; a dogmatic saying; a maxim, an apothegm.
    • 1949, Bruce Kiskaddon, George R. Stewart, Earth Abides
      ...a dictum which he had heard an economics professor once propound...
  2. A judicial opinion expressed by judges on points that do not necessarily arise in the case, and are not involved in it.
  3. The report of a judgment made by one of the judges who has given it.
  4. An arbitrament or award.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dīcō (say, speak).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dictum n (genitive dictī); second declension

  1. a word, saying, something said
  2. proverb, maxim
  3. bon mot, witticism
  4. verse, poetry
  5. a prophesy, prediction
  6. order, command
  7. promise, assurance

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative dictum dicta
genitive dictī dictōrum
dative dictō dictīs
accusative dictum dicta
ablative dictō dictīs
vocative dictum dicta

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ParticipleEdit

dictum

  1. nominative neuter singular of dictus
  2. accusative masculine singular of dictus
  3. accusative neuter singular of dictus
  4. vocative neuter singular of dictus

VerbEdit

dictum

  1. supine of dīcō

ReferencesEdit

  • dictum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 15:38