dirigiste

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French dirigiste, from diriger (to run, to direct), from Latin dirigere, present active infinitive of dīrigō (I direct, I steer).

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /dɪɹəˈʒist/, /dɪɹɪˈʒist/
    • (file)
    • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

dirigiste (comparative more dirigiste, superlative most dirigiste)

  1. Controlled or guided by a central authority, as in an economy.
    • 1982, Norman Barry, “The Tradition of Spontaneous Order”, in Literature of Liberty, volume 5, number 2, pages 7-58:
      The repeated crises in dirigiste systems are in essence crises of information since the abolition of the market leaves the central planner bereft of that economic knowledge which is required for harmony.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

dirigiste (plural dirigistes)

  1. An advocate or practitioner of dirigisme.
    • 2019 July 1, Brooks, David, “Moderates Have the Better Story”, in The New York Times:
      Warren wants to centralize economic decisions, creating a Department of Economic Development — a top-down council of government dirigistes.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From diriger +‎ -iste.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dirigiste (plural dirigistes)

  1. (relational) of dirigisme; dirigiste

NounEdit

dirigiste m or f (plural dirigistes)

  1. dirigiste (advocate of dirigisme)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dirigiste

  1. feminine plural of dirigista

NounEdit

dirigiste f

  1. plural of dirigista

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

dirigiste

  1. second-person singular preterite indicative of dirigir

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /diɾiˈxiste/, [d̪i.ɾiˈxis.t̪e]

VerbEdit

dirigiste

  1. second-person singular preterite indicative of dirigir