Last modified on 7 March 2015, at 12:34

doeskin

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

doe +‎ skin.

AdjectiveEdit

doeskin (not comparable)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Manufactured from doeskin.
    • 1916: Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Lost Continent [1]
      A long knife was in the doeskin belt that supported the doeskin skirt tightly about her lithe limbs.

NounEdit

doeskin (countable and uncountable, plural doeskins)

  1. (uncountable) Leather from the skin of a female deer or sheep.
    • 1856: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Hiawatha [2]
      He was dressed in shirt of doeskin, / White and soft, and fringed with ermine, / All inwrought with beads of wampum...
  2. (countable) The hide of a doe, as opposed to a buck.
    Frequently, doeskins had a higher value in trade than the skins of bucks, as they were considered of finer quality.
  3. (countable) A glove made of doeskin leather; usually constructed in plural.
    Elizabeth accidentally left her doeskins on the pew at Sunday service.
  4. (uncountable) A very soft, close-napped fabric, especially of high quality.
    • 1905: William Cowper Brann, The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 10 [3]
      In the morning Mr. Logan wore a doeskin box coat with pearl buttons nearly as large as alarm clocks in two rows on it.