See also: skiń

English edit

 
Anatomy of the human skin
 
Moulted cicada skins

Etymology edit

From Middle English skyn, skinn, from Old English scinn, from Old Norse skinn (animal hide), from Proto-Germanic *skinþą, from Proto-Indo-European *sken- (to split off), nasal variant of *skeh₁i-d- (to cut).

See also Dutch schinde (bark), dialectal German Schinde (fruit peel); also Breton skant (scales), Old Irish ceinn, Irish scainim (I tear, burst), Latin scindere (to split, divide), Sanskrit छिनत्ति (chinátti, he splits). Partially displaced native Old English hȳd (skin, hide), see hide. More at shed. Not related to shin.

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: skĭn, IPA(key): /skɪn/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Noun edit

skin (countable and uncountable, plural skins)

  1. (uncountable) The outer protective layer of the body of any animal, including of a human.
    • 2020, Abi Daré, The Girl With The Louding Voice, Sceptre, page 184:
      Her skin is pale like chicken skin, after you have peel[ed] all the feathers.
    He is so disgusting he makes my skin crawl.
  2. (uncountable) The outer protective layer of the fruit of a plant.
  3. (countable) The skin and fur of an individual animal used by humans for clothing, upholstery, etc.
  4. (countable) A congealed layer on the surface of a liquid.
    In order to get to the rest of the paint in the can, you′ll have to remove the skin floating on top of it.
  5. (countable, computing, graphical user interface) A set of resources that modifies the appearance and/or layout of the graphical user interface of a computer program.
    You can use this skin to change how the browser looks.
  6. (countable, video games) An alternate appearance (texture map or geometry) for a character model in a video game.
  7. (countable, slang) Rolling paper for cigarettes.
    Pass me a skin, mate.
  8. (countable, slang) Clipping of skinhead.
    • 2017, Christian Picciolini, White American Youth:
      By the end of the show, fights would break out all over the place: the Atlantic City skins against the crew from Philly; the oldschool skinheads feuding with overzealous fresh-cuts.
  9. (Australia) A subgroup of Australian aboriginal people; such divisions are cultural and not related to an individual′s physical skin. [1]
    • 1984, Maxwell John Charlesworth, Howard Morphy, Diane Bell, Religion in Aboriginal Australia: An Anthology, page 361:
      The younger brother questions the correctness of the pursuit of the girls. "They may be of the wrong subsection," he suggests. "We can take wrong skins," says the older brother, but the younger still holds back.
  10. (slang) Bare flesh, particularly bare breasts.
    Let me see a bit of skin.
  11. A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids.
    • 1843, Richard Henry Horne, Orion:
      the Bacchic train,
      Who brought their skins of wine, and loaded poles
      That bent with mighty clusters of black grapes
  12. (nautical) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole.
    • (Can we date this quote?), “Textile Technology Digest”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      The skin of the sail is made of stretch-resistant Mylar
  13. (nautical) The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing.
  14. (aviation) The outer surface covering much of the wings and fuselage of an aircraft.
  15. A drink of whisky served hot.
  16. (slang, Ireland, Britain) person, chap
    He was a decent old skin.
    • 2019, Joe Murragh, Colin Barrett, 54:50 from the start, in Calm With Horses (film), spoken by Paudi (Ned Dennehy):
      PAUDI:”I fucking love the pair of ye! You’re good lads. You’re loyal skins
  17. (UK, thieves slang, obsolete) A purse.
    • 1863, George William MacArthur Reynolds, The Mysteries of the Court of London, volume 3, page 86:
      [] and away I scampered with the tiddlywink-table, while Teddy Limber [] frisked the yokel of his yack and skin.

Synonyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Hyponyms of the noun skin

Derived terms edit

Terms derived from the noun skin without the hyponyms

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

References edit

Verb edit

skin (third-person singular simple present skins, present participle skinning, simple past and past participle skinned)

  1. (transitive) To injure the skin of.
    He fell off his bike and skinned his knee on the concrete.
  2. (transitive) To remove the skin and/or fur of an animal or a human.
  3. (colloquial) To high five.
  4. (transitive, computing, colloquial) To apply a skin to (a computer program).
    Can I skin the application to put the picture of my cat on it?
  5. (UK, soccer, transitive) To use tricks to go past a defender.
    • 2011 January 30, Kevin Darlng, “Arsenal 2 - 1 Huddersfield”, in BBC[1]:
      The Russian, sometimes out of sorts in recent weeks, was seeing plenty of the ball on the left-hand side up against Hunt, a 20-year-old right-back making his first Huddersfield start. Arshavin skinned the youngster at the first opportunity and crossed for Bendtner, who could not direct his close-range effort on target.
  6. (intransitive) To become covered with skin.
    A wound eventually skins over.
  7. (transitive) To cover with skin, or as if with skin; hence, to cover superficially.
  8. (US, slang, archaic) To produce, in recitation, examination, etc., the work of another for one's own, or to use cribs, memoranda, etc., which are prohibited.
  9. (slang, dated) To strip of money or property; to cheat.
  10. (intransitive, obsolete, slang) To sneak off.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ 1994, Macquarie Aboriginal Words, Macquarie University, paperback →ISBN, Introduction.

Anagrams edit

Abinomn edit

Noun edit

skin

  1. star

Cimbrian edit

Etymology edit

From Norwegian ski +‎ -an (infinitive suffix).

Verb edit

skin

  1. (Luserna) to ski

Noun edit

skin n

  1. (Luserna) skiing

References edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

skin n (singular definite skinnet, not used in plural form)

  1. light, glare
  2. semblance

Verb edit

skin

  1. imperative of skinne

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

skin m or f (plural skins, diminutive skinnetje n)

  1. (computing) Skin
  2. Short for skinhead.

Anagrams edit

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From skína (to shine).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

skin n (genitive singular skins, nominative plural skin)

  1. shine, shimmer, brightness

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Noun edit

skin

  1. Alternative form of skyn

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

skin

  1. inflection of skina:
    1. present
    2. imperative

Old Saxon edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From skīnan.

Noun edit

skīn n

  1. shine

Portuguese edit

Noun edit

skin f (plural skins)

  1. (computing) skin (image used as the background of a graphical user interface)
  2. (countable, video games) skin (alternate appearance (texture map or geometry) for a 3D character model in a video game)

Swedish edit

Verb edit

skin

  1. imperative of skina

Tok Pisin edit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Etymology edit

From English skin.

Noun edit

skin

  1. (anatomy) skin
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 2:21:
      Orait God, Bikpela i mekim man i slip i dai tru. Na taim man i slip yet, God i kisim wanpela bun long banis bilong man na i pasim gen skin bilong dispela hap.
      →New International Version translation

Derived terms edit

Volapük edit

Noun edit

skin (nominative plural skins)

  1. skin

Declension edit

Derived terms edit