TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

nap

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Neapolitan.

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian (to doze, slumber, sleep), from Proto-West Germanic *hnappōn (to nap). Cognate with Old High German hnaffezan, hnaffezzan (whence Middle High German nafzen (to slumber) whence German dialectal napfezen, nafzen (to nod, slumber, nap)).

NounEdit

nap (plural naps)

  1. A short period of sleep, especially one during the day.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:shut-eye, Thesaurus:sleep
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for collocations of nap.

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. To have a nap; to sleep for a short period of time, especially during the day.
    Synonyms: snooze, doze
  2. (figuratively) To be off one's guard.
    The regulators were caught napping by the financial collapse.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From late Middle English noppe, nappe, from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German noppe, noppen (to trim the nap), ultimately from knappen (to eat, crack), of imitative origin. Related to the first element of knapsack.

NounEdit

nap (countable and uncountable, plural naps)

  1. A soft or fuzzy surface, generally on fabric or leather.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
      I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dress the commonwealth, and turn it, and set a new nap upon it.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “16”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299:
      On his long, gaunt body, he carried no spare flesh, no superfluous beard, his chin having a soft, economical nap to it, like the worn nap of his broad-brimmed hat.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, page 37:
      There were low bookshelves, there was a thick pinkish Chinese rug in which a gopher could have spent a week without showing his nose above the nap.
    • 1961, Skyline, page 9:
      THEY CALL IT the "nap of the Earth," that area from the ground to the level of surrounding trees and hills, the thin rug of foliage and rock folds at the Earth's skin line that has become all-important to the United States Army.
    • 1987, Some Data Processing Requirements for Precision Nap-Of-the-Earth (NOE) Guidance and Control of Rotorcraft:
      If incorporated in automatic guidance, this practical pursuit adjustment will enhance pilot acceptance of automatic guidance in following nap-of-the-earth profiles with precision.
  2. The common direction, on some kinds of fabric, of the hairs making up the pile.
    If the fabric has a nap, make sure all pieces are cut with the nap going the same direction.
    • 1969, Classic Car, volumes 17-19, page 32:
      Instead of grinding the pistons straight around the axis, they are ground diagonally with a special-built machine. As a result, the “nap” of the metal is turned in such a way that, when it meets the “nap” of the cylinder wall, both surfaces quickly develop a high finish which removes the danger of scoring a piston.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. To form or raise a soft or fuzzy surface on (fabric or leather).

Etymology 3Edit

From the name of the French emperor Napoleon I of France.

NounEdit

nap (countable and uncountable, plural naps)

  1. (Britain) A type of bet in British horse racing, based on the experts' best tips.
    • 2005, Leighton Vaughan-Williams, The Economics of Gambling (page 71)
      4. Races run on English, Welsh or Scottish racecourses. This criterion was included so that media tipsters [sic] nap selections in general could be analysed; the source of naps, The Racing Rag 'tipster table', summarises the nap selections of newspaper tipsters, who restrict their selection to horses running at racecourses in these countries.
  2. (uncountable, card games) A card game in which players take tricks; properly Napoleon.
  3. A bid to take five tricks in the card game Napoleon.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Swedish nappa (to pluck, pinch). Related to nab.

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (obsolete) To grab; to nab.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From French napper, from nappe (nape).

VerbEdit

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (cooking) To cover (something) with a sauce. (usually in the passive)
    • 2006, Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs:
      Vanilla ice cream topped with a poached or canned pear half, napped with chocolate sauce, and garnished with toasted sliced almonds.

Etymology 6Edit

From Middle English nap (a bowl), from Old English hnæpp (a cup, bowl), from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz (a cup, bowl). Cognate with Dutch nap (drinking cup), German Napf (bowl), Low German Napp (bowl, cup), Icelandic hnappur (button, key). Doublet of hanap. See also nappy.

NounEdit

nap (plural naps)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland) A cup, bowl.
ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan nap, from Latin nāpus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip, Brassica rapa

ReferencesEdit


ChuukeseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nap

  1. great

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch nap, from Old Dutch nap, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural nappen, diminutive napje n)

  1. drinking cup

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap (plural napok)

  1. day
    Egy hét hét napból áll.A week consists of seven days.
  2. sun (also written Nap in astronomical context), (in compounds) solar
    Süt a nap.The sun is shining.
    napszélsolar wind
    naprendszersolar system

Usage notesEdit

(day):

Adverbs of temporal nouns     (see also: Appendix:Hungarian words of time)
no suffix (the noun
can act as an adverb
)
nappal (daytime), reggel (early morning), délelőtt (late morning), délután (afternoon), este (evening), éjjel / éjszaka (night), and vasárnap (Sunday)
-kor (at) pirkadat / virradat (dawn), napkelte (sunrise), napnyugta (sunset), alkonyat (dusk), szürkület (twilight), éjfél (midnight), hours and minutes, and the names of holidays (húsvét (Easter) etc.)
-ban/-ben (in) dél (noon), hajnal (daybreak), names of months (januárdecember) and hónap (month), évszak (season), év (year) and specific years, évtized (decade) and longer periods
-n/-on/-en/-ön (on) days of the week (hétfőszombat) except Sunday, days of the month (elseje (1st), másodika (2nd) etc.), nap (day), hét (week), nyár (summer), and tél (winter)
-val/-vel (with, assimilated: -szal/-szel) tavasz (spring), ősz (autumn, fall)

(sun): Some astronomical and geographical terms have both a lowercase (common noun) and a capitalized (proper noun) form. For föld (ground, soil)―​Föld (Earth), hold (moon, satellite)―​Hold (the Moon), and nap (day; sun)―​Nap (the Sun), the lowercase forms are used in the everyday sense and the capitalized forms in the astronomical sense. In other similar pairs, the former refers to generic sense, and the latter specifies the best known referent: egyenlítő (equator)―​Egyenlítő (Equator), naprendszer (solar system, planetary system)―​Naprendszer (Solar System), and tejút (galaxy, literally “milky way”, but galaxis and galaktika are more common)―​Tejút (Milky Way).[1][2][3][4]

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative nap napok
accusative napot napokat
dative napnak napoknak
instrumental nappal napokkal
causal-final napért napokért
translative nappá napokká
terminative napig napokig
essive-formal napként napokként
essive-modal
inessive napban napokban
superessive napon napokon
adessive napnál napoknál
illative napba napokba
sublative napra napokra
allative naphoz napokhoz
elative napból napokból
delative napról napokról
ablative naptól napoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
napé napoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
napéi napokéi
Possessive forms of nap
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. napom napjaim
2nd person sing. napod napjaid
3rd person sing. napja napjai
1st person plural napunk napjaink
2nd person plural napotok napjaitok
3rd person plural napjuk napjaik

Derived termsEdit

Compound words
Expressions

AdverbEdit

nap

  1. (following certain adjectives) on the specified (kind or number of) day(s)
    Synonym: napon
    minden áldott nap(on) every single day
    Egész nap ott voltunk.We were there (on) the whole day.
    Egyik nap ezt akarja, (a) másik nap meg azt.S/he wants one thing on some days and another (thing) on other days.
    Egy nap úgy döntött, elég volt.(On) some day s/he decided enough was enough.

Usage notesEdit

Using a bare noun for an adverb is typical for times of the day like reggel (morning), este (evening) etc., but not for time units like minute, hour, week, month, or year, which all take a suffix when used as adverbs (percben, órában, héten, hónapban, évben). Even nap takes -on in most cases other than those above. However, the bare form also occurs in compound adverbs such as aznap, másnap, mindennap and vasárnap (the latter functions as a noun too), as well as tegnap and holnap.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ nap in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit

  • nap in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hnæpp, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap (plural nappes)

  1. A bowl for one's beverages; a chalice.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: nap (now dialectal)
  • Scots: nap
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A back-formation from nappen.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap

  1. A nap or doze; a short sleep.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

nap

  1. Alternative form of nappen

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan nap, from Latin nāpus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip (Brassica rapa)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāpus.

NounEdit

nap m (plural napi)

  1. turnip or swede (Brassica napus)
  2. carrot

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit